Drawing parallels with Orica-Scott's winning TTT ride at the 2013 Tour de France, Team Sunweb showed how a group united can go from underdog to top dog, writes Anthony Tan.
Well here I was, Sunday afternoon in Oz, about to pen a blog on whether the men's world championship team time trial was worth watching when seven WorldTour teams couldn't be bothered showing up for fear of being humiliated and only three ...
Form comes from lots of places, which means there are lots of places you can find it. This is the first in a series of posts by Kath Bicknell about how to build your fitness to a point where you can swap the bad pain for the good pain, or ride in...
I found myself making plans the other day. This sounds like something most people do most days, but these plans were different. I’ve been healing a pretty serious injury for the last 18 months and a different one for 12 months before that....
Team Sky’s suffocating stranglehold on cycling’s Grand Tours has no apparent end, with rival squads starting to make mental concessions to the conquering British powerhouse.
Sky - through preeminent leader, Chris Froome - won both the Tour de France and the  Vuelta a España this season at the expense of an exasperated peloton. “We need to hope one of the guys has an off-day - I’m kind of afraid it’s gone that ...

Tan Lines: Less is best?

The decision to field a less than full elite women's team at the upcoming road worlds in Norway may have been overturned, but it's nonetheless a direction Cycling Australia's high performance director is intent on pursuing, writes Anthony Tan.
It was hard to comprehend how Australia, the third-best cycling nation in the world as far as elite women go, did not have enough "quality" riders to fulfil all seven available spots for this year's road world championships in Bergen, Norw...

How not to corner

A short photo essay on how to fail at one of cycling’s fundamental skills.
1. Pre-ride the corner. Forget everything you observed.   2. Come in fast.   3. Focus on being photographed, rather than things like weight distribution, speed, line choice or surface condition.   4. BOOM! Cornering Fail! 5. I’m sure my ...

Tan Lines: History Made

There was no greater juxtaposition than the way two Grand Tour champions rode the final stage of the 2017 Vuelta a España, writes Anthony Tan.
Two stars, at opposing ends of their careers. The final stage said it all. Chris Froome, not content with 'only' being the winner of the 72nd Vuelta a España, and the first person in history to win the Tour de France followed by the Spanis...
On paper, the level of difficulty for this year's Vuelta a España was turned up to 11, but harder is not always better, writes Anthony Tan.
It was just one of 50 summits to be traversed in the 72nd Vuelta a España, and it came midway through the fifteenth leg from Alcalá la Real to Alto Hoya de la Mora, Sierra Nevada. The main action was always expected to happen on the final,...
It was a matter of days following the cancellation of this year’s Indian Pacific Wheel Race that Jesse Carlsson was left to wonder if he’d created ultra-endurance racing’s version of Mt. Everest.
Mike Hall was dead. The British giant of ultra-endurance racing killed on a day when the inaugural event was to be decided. Hall was chasing down leader Kristof Allegaert when his life ended on the Monaro Highway en route to Sydney. And ye...
Over the past few years cycling has become a global phenomenon – and one with a growing social divide, writes Steve Thomas.
A number of issues are guaranteed to raise eyebrows and ire, but one in particular is social class and the perceived ever-growing divide between the rich and the poor. Sure, social and financial divides have always existed, and while many ...
222 million Euro transfers don't happen in cycling and never will. Neither will 50,000 Benjamin Franklins for bowing out in the first round of a Grand Slam, akin to missing the time cut on the opening stage of a Grand Tour. Still, if you're good...
A year a half after reaching a career-high ranking of 17 in the world, Bernard Tomic, Australian tennis' enfant terrible, courtesy of his 11th first round exit in the 16 tournaments he's played this year, will slip to somewhere in the 150s...