During the mid 90s, a Bosnian Australian bravely returns to his homeland to record the impact the siege of Sarajevo had on its inhabitants.

By
David Stratton

1 Jan 2009 - 12:00 AM  UPDATED 1 Jan 2009 - 12:00 AM
5
Exile In Sarajevo is reportage of the most dynamic kind, a film filled with anger and horror - and yet also with love.
When the war in Bosnia broke out, Tahir Cambis, an Australian of Bosnian extraction, decided he simply had to go there and see what was happening for himself. With great difficulty, he made it to Sarajevo, accompanied by an Australian cameraman, and he hired as sound recordist a local woman, Alma Sahbaz. Alma`s immensely strong personality soon steered Tahir`s film in the course it was destined to follow - intimate coverage filled with insider knowledge of the way the proud, immensely brave citizens of Sarajevo coped with the monstrous war fought against them. Some of the episodes in Exile In Sarajevo are almost unbearably painful: a little girl reads graphic excerpts from her diary; another child is killed soon after she`s filmed taking part in a dance contest, and her mother becomes a major participant in the harrowing drama. Exile In Sarajevo is reportage of the most dynamic kind, a film filled with anger and horror - and yet also with love, because Tahir fell in love with Alma as the shooting proceeded. We`re going to be seeing more films about the terrible tragedy of Sarajevo in the months to come, but few are likely to be as powerful as this authentic, on-the-spot, wrenchingly emotional documentary.

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1 hour 30 min

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