5
Film lovers should rush to see this glorious revival.

Touch of Evil, released in 1958, was the last film Orson Welles made in America. He'd hoped this taut thriller about police corruption and manipulation in a seedy Mexican bordertown would be a big success; instead, Universal, the studio, took it away from him and recut it, plastering the credits over his beautifully intricate single take opening sequence – a sequence which has deservedly become a classic. Now Touch of Evil is re-released in a 'director's cut'– following the instructions in a memo Welles sent Universal in which he pleaded for his film. The result is breathtaking, like seeing an old friend who's been rejuvenated. Not only is the opening sequence even more brilliant now that our eyes aren't distracted by the credits, but the entire film has more depth and clarity than ever before, its tragic events even more moving and exciting. Film lovers should rush to see this glorious revival.