Ahead of his speaking tour of Australia next week, controversial far-right Dutch MP Geert Wilders says he's open to meeting with any Australian politician who will have him.
By
staff

14 Feb 2013 - 8:14 AM  UPDATED 26 Aug 2013 - 10:48 AM

Ahead of his speaking tour of Australia next week, controversial far-right Dutch MP Geert Wilders says he's open to meeting with any Australian politician who will have him.

Mr Wilders, who is calling for an end to Islamic migration to Europe and compares the Koran to Hitler's Mein Kampf, did not specify whether he'd be holding talks with any particular political figures during his visit.

He said a possible meeting with Liberal Senator Cory Bernardi, who he's previously held talks with in Europe, now looked unlikely given Australia was in an election year.

Speaking with the ABC, Mr Wilders had this message for Australian politicians ahead of his arrival.

"Australian politicians, don't be afraid of me. I'm a lawmaker, not a lawbreaker and I'm just telling the truth and I want Australia, a country and a people that I respect very much - any Dutchman knows that young Australians fought for our freedom in the first and second World War - I hope I can tell you what happened in Europe and support you in your fight to preserve freedom for your children."

But Attorney-General Mark Dreyfus has dismissed warnings by a controversial Dutch politician that Australia needs to learn from Europe and be vigilant of Islam by not allowing the mass immigration of Muslim people.

Geert Wilders, the leader of the Party for Freedom that holds the balance of power in the Dutch parliament, made the comment ahead of his visit to Australia next week.

Mr Wilders says he wants to warn Australia against allowing the mass immigration of people from Muslim countries because Islam and freedom are incompatible.

But, speaking to the ABC, Mr Dreyfus says Mr Wilders' views have no relevance in Australia.

"We're a long established democracy with successful multiculturalism. We're also a country with a long standing commitment to free speech and robust political debate. Mr Wilders is free to come and express his views here in Australia, but I'm equally free to condemn them and the government does condemn the views that he expressed and I imagine he's going to be expressing during his speaking tour here in Australia."