A new plan which aims to overhaul Indigenous affairs in New South Wales is working on keeping Indigenous children at school and providing stronger career prospects.
By
Matthew Sadler

Source:
NITV News
6 Apr 2013 - 9:30 AM  UPDATED 3 Sep 2013 - 6:14 PM

OCHRE will focus on the link between learning Indigenous languages and improvements in other aspects of life.

Professor Shane Houston from Sydney University says the new plan will help young Aboriginals to engage more effectively with schooling and the workplace.

"By teaching language, by locating that in a cultural context in our schools we're not only going to be helping individuals with their own sense of identity we're going to be helping them to be healthier individuals…'' said Professor Houston.

The number of Aboriginal languages spoken in New South Wales has declined from 139, 200 years ago, to just 10.

The new plan will see five of these, Gamilaraay, Gumbaynggir, Bundjalung, Paarkintji/Barkindji and Wiradjuri taught in schools.

The NSW Aboriginal Affairs Minister, Victor Dominello says the new plan new plan will consult with Indigenous people regularly through a new Independent Aboriginal Council.

"Culture and language is critical. That's why we must do something now to preserve it and keep it alive for the next generation. If we don't do something it will leave us on our watch."

"Culture and language is critical. That's why we must do something now to preserve it and keep it alive for the next generation. If we don't do something it will leave us on our watch,” said Mr Dominello.