Are you drinking what I’m thinking? Eurovision is a funny business, made all the more hilarious with drinking games!
2 May 2016 - 1:38 PM  UPDATED 12 May 2017 - 11:22 AM

In the harsh light of day, amongst empty bottles and the upturned Melting Pot: pour a glass of water, drop a tablet and as the effervescent fizz brings you back to life - thank Switzerland for giving us Berocca.

CAPTAIN EURO

Each party guest is assigned an element: EARTH, FIRE, WIND, WATER or HEART. Guests must drain their drinks when their element is represented on stage as follows:

EARTH - Barefoot singers (a trend popular with winners Loreen and Emmelie de Forrest)


FIRE - Any use of pyrotechnics

WIND - Duh, wind machine

WATER - Water features (Think Jedward 2012!)


HEART - Love hearts and love songs


 

KING OF CHEERS

 

Start with a deck of cards face down on a table. One by one, each party guest must draw a card and complete the action as follows:

ACE- The person who draws an Ace must sing the chorus of Gina G’s Ooh Ahh (Just a Little Bit.) If they don’t know the lyrics, they must drink.

2 - The person who draws a 2 must imitate the “crab walk” made famous by Loreen in 2012. If they can’t do it, they must drink.

3 - The person who draws a 3 must perform their best heavy-metal air guitar to Lordi’s Hard Rock Hallelujah. If they refuse, they must drink.

4 - The person who draws a 4 must reveal their all-time favourite Eurovision song. If they refuse, they must drink.

5 - All boys must drink!

6 - All girls must drink!

7 - Anyone in lycra must drink!

8 - Anyone not in costume must scull!

9 - Wildcard. A party guest must nominate a Eurovision-themed action for the person who draws a 9. If they refuse to complete it, they must drink.

10 - The person who draws a 10 must sing “Irlande Douze Pointe” in their best Irish accent a la Dustin the Turkey from Eurovision 2008. If they fail, they must drink.

JACK - The person who draws a Jack must imitate Michael Flatley’s Riverdance as was first introduced to the world at Eurovision in 1994. If they refuse, they must drink.

QUEEN - The person who draws a Queen must say one sentence from a non-English speaking country represented at Eurovision. If they can’t, they must drink.

KING - The person who draws a King may nominate anyone from the party to do any of the above actions!

 

 

A LITTLE BIT COUNTRY, A LITTLE BIT ROCK’N’MOLE

To begin the game, everyone must draw a country from a 40-deck of pre-prepared cards. Participants must conceal this country from other players. Although tonight you may have come dressed to defend Austria, you are secretly supporting the country on your card.

In an act of international espionage, every time your country is mentioned on TV you must take a drink on the sly. If you are caught out (each player has three guesses to outwit their opponent) you must drain your drink. The last country standing needs never refill their own glass. It is now the duty of the fallen players to ensure the winner’s glass is never empty.

 

THE MULTICULTURAL MELTING POT

Repeat the first step from Game 1.

Place a large Euro-themed vessel in the middle of your table (something terracotta, nothing with holes). An extension of the previous drinking game, players must add:

ONE splash of their drink to The Multicultural Melting Pot whenever anyone says or sings the word “love”.

TWO splashes to TMMP if anyone mentions “peace” be it explicitly, in song lyrics or forked fingers.


THREE splashes should somebody reference “hope”.
Whoever holds the country’s card that scores lowest in Eurovision must skull the contents of TMMP. Bottoms up!

 

STOP. SLAMMER TIME!

Bung Note: If someone fails to hit the High C – drink.

Cheers: If audience applause lasts longer than 10 seconds – drink.


Mind Blank: If someone forgets their words – drain.


Phallic Prop Use: If someone enters straddling an oversized banana – drain.


Key Change: If someone key changes – this is an automatic toilet pass (otherwise no bathroom concession is allowed).

Costume Reveal: If someone strips off part of their costume – strip off one item of clothing.

Pyrotechnics: If someone’s act draws upon fireworks – everyone must stop, drop and roll, crawling from the house to the street and only re-entering once everyone is outside.

Everybody Dance Now: If someone’s act requires more than four back-up dancers – everyone must leap immediately from their seat and bust-it to another spot in the room.

Getting Wind of Things: Anytime a wind machine is turned on - grab the drink of the person beside you and scull it.

 

Your Eurovision party won't be any fun for anyone if you get completely hammered, so remember to drink responsibly!

The Eurovision Song Contest will be broadcast over SBS’s Eurovision weekend - Friday 12 May, Saturday 13 May, and Grand Final Sunday 14 May at 7.30pm on SBS with LIVE early morning broadcasts begin Wednesday 10 May at 5am on SBS.

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