• Michael (L) and Kai Korokafter they became the first same-sex couple to adopt a child in Germany, days after Germany allowed same-sex couples to wed. (DPA (Photo credit should read BRITTA PEDERSEN/AFP/Getty Images))
"It is a wonderful feeling to be jointly registered as parents."
By
Michaela Morgan

11 Oct 2017 - 2:24 PM  UPDATED 11 Oct 2017 - 2:24 PM

Two Berlin-based men have become the first same-sex couple to adopt a child—following recent changes to German law that has advanced the rights of the LGBT+ community.

The country’s parliament voted in favour of marriage equality in June, which granted same-sex couples the same access to tax advantages and adoption rights as their straight counterparts.

Michael and Kai Korok were among the first group of couples to wed under the new law and now they’ve made history by becoming the first gay couple to legally adopt a child.

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After marrying in Berlin on October 2nd, the couple applied to legally adopt their two-year-old son Maximillian, whom they have been fostering since his birth.

"It is a wonderful feeling to be jointly registered as parents," Michael Korok told Deutsche Welle.

Germany’s Lesbian and Gay Federation (LSVD) spokesman Joerg Steinert told AFP that the adoption was a significant victory for the LGBT+ community.

"It's once again a big step forward for gays and lesbians with better judicial security," LSVD spokesman Joerg Steinert told AFP.

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"It is also proof that 'marriage for all' is not just symbolic,” he said of the recent marriage equality win.

A statement from the LSVD notes that Michael and Kai were previously taking legal action before the Federal Constitutional Court to gain legal custody of their son.

"With ‘Marriage for all’, it was possible to avoid a renewed discussion of the ending of state discrimination against lesbians and gays before the highest German court."