• Simon Yates of Great Britain and Orica GreenEDGE (Getty) (Getty Images)Source: Getty Images
Orica-GreenEDGE British climber Simon Yates has returned a positive result for a controlled substance.
By
Cycling Central

29 Apr 2016 - 9:19 AM  UPDATED 29 Apr 2016 - 1:30 PM

Yates tested positive for Terbutaline at Paris-Nice, a result confirmed by Orica-GreenEDGE in a released statement. 

Yates returned a positive test for the substance, which is used to relieve asthma symptoms, following a test conducted after stage six of Paris-Nice race on March 12.

Yates finished sixth on the stage.

Orica-GreenEdge claimed an administrative error led to the substance being administered without the required therapeutic user exemption (TUE) certificate.

"There has been no wrong-doing on Simon Yates' part," Orica-GreenEDGE said in a statement.

"The team takes full responsibility for this mistake and wishes to underline their support for Simon during this process.

"The substance was given to Simon Yates in the form an asthma inhaler and accordingly, this was noted by the team doctor on the doping control form, signed at the time of the test.

"However, in this case the team doctor made an administrative error by failing to apply for the TUE required for the use of this treatment."

The 23-year-old is considered one of Britain's most promising cycling prospects, having taken part in the past two Tour de France campaigns.

Yates, whose twin brother Adam also races for Orica-GreenEdge, was a contender to ride in the Rio Olympics road race.

Orica-GreenEDGE have been in contact with the UCI about the matter, while also expressing their concern as to how the information came to be leaked.

Orica-GreenEDGE statement

On April 22, the team was notified that Simon Yates has an adverse analytical finding from a test conducted at Paris-Nice, stage 6 on March 12, 2016.

The positive result is for the substance Terbutaline.

The substance was given to Simon Yates in the form an asthma inhaler and accordingly, this was noted by the team doctor on the Doping Control Form, signed at the time of the test.

The substance was given in an ongoing treatment of Simon Yates’ documented asthma problems. However, in this case the team doctor made an administrative error by failing to apply for the TUE required for the use of this treatment. 

The use of Terbutaline without a current TUE is the reason it has been flagged as an adverse analytical finding. This is solely based on a human error that the doctor in question has taken full responsibility for.

There has been no wrong-doing on Simon Yates’ part. The team takes full responsibility for this mistake and wishes to underline their support for Simon during this process.

The team is concerned by the leak of this information and has no further comments until there has been a full evaluation made of the documentation, statements and evidence that the team and Simon Yates are now submitting to the UCI in order to clarify everything.