It's always enjoyable watching Australians win medals on the boards but the track squads dominant Commonwealth Games performance was not indicative of our true strength, writes Mike Tomalaris.
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7 Apr 2015 - 11:32 PM  UPDATED 13 Apr 2015 - 3:36 PM

How good was the track cycling program at the Commonwealth Games last
week?

I mean how good is Australia - really?

If you didn't
know better, you'd think we have the best nation on two wheels on the
planet by a mile.

Problem is the real cycling world is not
represented in Delhi, and the truth is Australia is possibly the only
fully developed cycling nation which had bothered to take its strongest
squad to the Games.

"Gold, gold, gold to Australia" has been the
constant cry from those calling the action on TV and radio in the last
few days.

But is it surprising given so much real opposition
never made the trek to India? Yes, I'm looking at you Sir Chris Hoy.

Of
course, you can only race against those who turn up and the
Australians were left to compete largely against themselves -
practically tripping over each other in the medal rush.

Australia's
national anthem was on speed-dial in the velodrome.

But when
ignorant sections of the commercial news media constantly talk-up our
two-wheel warriors as if they're super heroes, then it's time blog about
it.

Anna Meares, Cameron Meyer, Shane Perkins and Jack Bobridge
are the best in their respective fields but are they unbeatable?

In
most cases, yes, but that's not the point.

Did you see the way
Australia's team pursuit carved up the Kiwis for the gold medal? The
Aussies were incredible but the Kiwis just weren't in the same
velodrome.

What about the way Megan Dunn left rivals in her wake
as if they were standing still on the last two laps of the women's
scratch race?

Simply awesome! But again, where were the rest?

And
did you see the way Meyer outsmarted everyone else on the track in the
men's equivalent?

He was superb and justifies his place as a star
of the future, but he was racing against himself.

There's no
doubt we have a marvelous array of talent showing their wares and
there's no question each is a wonderful advertisement to the sport and
brilliant role models and ambassadors to their nation.

But I feel
the lop-sided competition in Delhi is doing more harm than good to
cycling, even if several PBs were recorded, not to mention the many
Games records that were set.

When one country obliterates the
opposition in every race it contests, I feel it doesn't conform to
the true spirit of sport anymore.

I say bring on the track World
Championships in March next year, or wait until the London Olympics to
compare notes and results.

Only then can Australia be in a
position to continue its chest-beating and claim cycling superiority.