Ask a non-Dane to name some famous foods from Denmark, and they’re likely to offer up 'pastries", 'butter" or 'herring". Indeed, the Danes are justifiably renowned for their superb butter, can’t get enough of herring and other cured fish, and specialise in light, flaky pastry – though no-one in Copenhagen would dream of asking for a 'Danish" at the patisserie. The sweet treats are known locally as Wienerbrød, after the Austrian bakers (reportedly strike-breakers) who brought their techniques to Denmark in the mid-19th century.Danish cuisine is all these clichés but much, much more. The well-known staples – a key one being dense wholegrain rye bread, traditionally baked weekly at home – are the building blocks of a hearty food culture that is steeped in tradition, is made for long, cold winters and celebrates blissful summer days.
14 Feb 2013 - 6:03 PM  UPDATED 6 Sep 2013 - 9:31 AM

Ask a non-Dane to name some famous foods from Denmark, and they’re
likely to offer up 'pastries", 'butter" or 'herring". Indeed, the Danes
are justifiably renowned for their superb butter, can’t get enough of
herring and other cured fish, and specialise in light, flaky pastry –
though no-one in Copenhagen would dream of asking for a 'Danish" at the
patisserie. The sweet treats are known locally as Wienerbrød, after the
Austrian bakers (reportedly strike-breakers) who brought their
techniques to Denmark in the mid-19th century.

Danish cuisine is
all these clichés but much, much more. The well-known staples – a key
one being dense wholegrain rye bread, traditionally baked weekly at home
– are the building blocks of a hearty food culture that is steeped in
tradition, is made for long, cold winters and celebrates blissful summer
days. More