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Gourmet Farmer | Starts Thurs Aug 1

With his new farm to table restaurant up and running, farmer and chef Matthew Evans is on a mission to improve the quality of his food by first improving the quality of his farm's soil. How hard can it be?

Tassie terrior

This season, Matthew Evans is looking for new ways to make his Tasmanian turf the best from sun to soil.

Matthew Evans dives deep into the question 'what does what I eat, eat?' turning his attention to soil regeneration this season, which starts 8pm Thursday 1 August on SBS.
'The view from the feedlot' is an exclusive edited extract from Matthew Evans' new book, On Eating Meat: The truth about its production and the ethics of eating it.
Want a hands-on chance to learn more about bush food? These Indigenous tour guides have a lot to share.
Jams are pantry staples, and preserves really should be. Matthew Evans, the Gourmet Farmer, gives his tips on how best to make these fruity favourites at home. ...

The secret to good soil

They say the secret to good soil structure is that it can retain water, yet drain. Friable enough so roots don’t rot, but moist enough so plants don’t die of thirst.

Gourmet Farmer recipes

I like to use both fresh and dried mushrooms with green beans and a tiny bit of minced pork, to add depth and complexity. This is one way of many to get the best...
The confit is delicious served with lots of roasted pumpkin and a chestnut and potato puree. Or you can strip the meat from the bone and toss through fresh...
The scent of Tassie’s native pepperberry adds a lovely note to luscious ice-cream. You can make the basic custard, called an ‘anglaise’ in French, in a double...
Kunzea is a native Tasmanian herb and is best, in our experience used dried. It’s got a powerful aroma reminiscent of citrus and thyme, overlaid with the scent of...
You can use white polenta made from white corn, if you can find it, for a more subtle result. Use the polenta as an accompaniment to a ragu of some kind, or...
You can only use properly purged snails for this Spanish-influenced dish. Don’t be put off by the slime - the end result is remarkably delicious.
I learned to make these in Sardinia with a friend’s aunt in the hills near the east coast. She nagged us the whole time to keep working and keep the dough moving...
I adore this recipe, adapted from a school recipe book from Western Australia. It’s a very moist, crumbly cake that is delicious at room temperature and gets...
Real jelly should be so soft it can't be tipped out of a mould. For this one, it's worth begging, borrowing or stealing the geranium leaves - just so long as it's...
These are the simplest ribs we cook and they’re a family favourite. A touch of home-made tomato sauce in the sauce gives them a little more depth and sweetness;...
This Italian dish is made using the sliced shin of veal or beef, the name meaning literally ‘bone hole’ after the marrow bones you use. Essentially a lovely stew,...
We love cooking with the leafy tops of our radishes, swedes and Japanese turnips but you can use whatever greens you have on hand including silverbeet, nettles or...