This simple Indian side dish is hearty, with potato and pork, and filled with great flavours from garlic, ginger and coriander. Serve it with steamed rice and dhal - search our website for a recipe.

Serves
4

Preparation

15min

Cooking

50min

Skill level

Easy
By
Average: 3.8 (4 votes)
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Ingredients

  • 4 potatoes, cut into 3 cm cubes
  • 500 ml vegetable oil
  • 10 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 3 cm piece ginger, grated
  • 700 g pork rashers (see Note), skin on, cut into 3 cm pieces
  • 500 ml vegetable stock
  • ¼ tsp salt
  • 1 onion, thinly sliced
  • 2 tbsp brown sugar
  • 12 spring onions, chopped
  • 1 bunch of coriander

Cook's notes

Oven temperatures are for conventional; if using fan-forced (convection), reduce the temperature by 20˚C. | We use Australian tablespoons and cups: 1 teaspoon equals 5 ml; 1 tablespoon equals 20 ml; 1 cup equals 250 ml. | All herbs are fresh (unless specified) and cups are lightly packed. | All vegetables are medium size and peeled, unless specified. | All eggs are 55-60 g, unless specified.

Instructions

Pat the potatoes dry with paper towel. Heat the oil over medium heat. Cook potatoes for 8 minutes or until golden brown. Drain on paper towel and set aside.

Drain oil, reserving 2 tbsp in the pan, and place over medium heat. Add the garlic cloves and ginger, and cook over medium heat for 1 minute or until fragrant. Increase heat to high, add pork to pan and stir for 2 minutes or until pork starts to change colour. Add the vegetable stock and salt, and bring to the boil. Reduce heat to low, partly cover and simmer for 30 minutes or until stock has reduced by half.

Add fried potatoes and onion. Cook for 4 minutes or until onion starts to soften. Stir in the brown sugar and spring onions. Cook, uncovered, over low heat, stirring occasionally, for 5 minutes or until heated through.

Stir in the leaves and the finely chopped stems of the coriander. Serve with rice and dhal.

Note

• Pork rashers are thin strips of pork belly. Available from supermarkets and butchers.  

As seen in Feast Magazine, Issue 14, pg146.

Photography by Jackson Eaton