This is a Dijon-style mustard with a little more kick, essentially blending the French and German styles.

Makes

Preparation

15min

Cooking

1hr

Skill level

Easy
By
Average: 3.4 (11 votes)
Yum

I've spent years developing my mustard recipes. In this one, I use horseradish to add that extra punch and it is just perfect to serve with dry-aged beef to really bring out the flavours.

Ingredients

  • 250 g mustard flour (ground mustard seeds)
  • 285 ml water
  • 750 ml white wine vinegar
  • brown onions, sliced
  • 3 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 1 bay leaves
  • 3 black peppercorns
  • small pinch of ground cloves (optional)
  • 25 g salt
  • 25 g sugar
  • 1½ tbsp grated fresh horseradish

Cook's notes

Oven temperatures are for conventional; if using fan-forced (convection), reduce the temperature by 20˚C. | We use Australian tablespoons and cups: 1 teaspoon equals 5 ml; 1 tablespoon equals 20 ml; 1 cup equals 250 ml. | All herbs are fresh (unless specified) and cups are lightly packed. | All vegetables are medium size and peeled, unless specified. | All eggs are 55-60 g, unless specified.

Instructions

Makes 750 g

Cooling time: 20 minutes

You will need to begin this recipe 3–4 days ahead for a fuller–flavoured mustard.

In a bowl, stir together the mustard flour and water to make a paste.

In a large saucepan, combine the vinegar, onion, garlic, bay leaves and peppercorns. Bring to a simmer over medium heat. Simmer mixture until reduced by two-thirds. Strain and leave to cool.

Stir the cooled vinegar reduction into the mustard paste. Add the salt, sugar and horseradish, stir to combine. Let the mixture stand for at least 20 minutes before transferring to a clean saucepan.

Cook for 15 minutes on a low simmer. Remove from heat and cool slightly before putting into sterilised jars.

The mustard will store for up to 1 year in a cool place.

 

Notes

• To sterilise bottles, make sure they are squeaky clean. A dishwasher will sterilise them. If handwashing, place in cool water and bring to the boil. When the water boils, the bottles are sterilised.

• Although you can eat it straightaway, it’s best to let the mustard "mature" for a few days at least to get a fuller flavour.