These moreish biscuits are spiced with cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger and allspice, plus a dash of black pepper to balance the flavours. Serve with mulled wine (vin chaud) for the perfect midnight snack in winter.

Makes
30

Preparation

1hr

Cooking

15min

Skill level

Easy
By
Average: 3.8 (10 votes)
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Ingredients

  • 100 g unsalted butter, softened 
  • 165 g (¾ cup) caster sugar 
  • 90 g (¼ cup) golden syrup 
  • 100 g crumbled walnuts 
  • ¼ tsp baking powder 
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon 
  • ¼ tsp ground nutmeg 
  • ½ tsp ground allspice 
  • ½ tsp ground ginger 
  • ½ tsp ground black pepper 
  • ¼ tsp salt 
  • 260 g (1¾ cups) plain flour, sifted 
  • 1 egg

Cook's notes

Oven temperatures are for conventional; if using fan-forced (convection), reduce the temperature by 20˚C. | We use Australian tablespoons and cups: 1 teaspoon equals 5 ml; 1 tablespoon equals 20 ml; 1 cup equals 250 ml. | All herbs are fresh (unless specified) and cups are lightly packed. | All vegetables are medium size and peeled, unless specified. | All eggs are 55-60 g, unless specified.

Instructions

Place butter, sugar and golden syrup in the bowl of an electric mixer and beat until pale and creamy. Set aside.

Process 60 g walnuts in a food processor until finely ground, then place in a large bowl. Add baking powder, spices, salt and flour.

With the electric mixer on medium speed, add egg to butter mixture, beating until just combined. Gradually add flour mixture and beat until just combined. Wrap the dough in plastic wrap and refrigerate for 30 minutes to rest; don’t worry if it still feels soft.

Preheat oven to 180°C and line 2 large oven trays. Shape tablespoons of dough into ovals of even thickness and lightly press a pinch of the remaining walnuts over a corner of each oval. Place biscuits on lined trays, leaving 3cm between each one and bake for 12 minutes, swapping trays halfway, or until golden. Set aside to cool on a wire rack. Biscuits will keep in an airtight container for up to 1 week. Serve with mulled wine.

 

 

Photography by Brett Stevens.

As seen in Feast magazine, Sept 2011, Issue 1. For more recipes and articles, pick up a copy of this month's Feast magazine or check out our great subscriptions offers here.