Following series two’s game-changing finale, will the third series of the Scandinavian crime series feel like a new show?
By
Gavin Scott

14 Jan 2016 - 3:57 PM  UPDATED 15 Jan 2016 - 5:28 PM

In the final moments of series two of The Bridge, normally jovial Danish detective Martin Rohde (Kim Bodnia) was in a not-so-amusing situation. He was arrested under suspicion of poisoning Jens Hansen (Lars Simonsen), the man responsible for the death of his son – amongst other things – in series one. The implication was that Martin’s offsider on the Swedish police, Saga Norén (Sofia Helin), was the one to turn him in.

This is what we need to know:

 

Will The Bridge work without Martin?

As much as Martin, his infectious laugh and seemingly endless supply of children were an enjoyable part of The Bridge, the series really hangs on Saga. And, while his absence is noticeable, it’s not show-destroying. After all, so much of The Bridge comes down to Saga’s reactions to the cases and her interactions with the people she comes across. As the “straight man”, Martin is replaceable.

 

How is Saga feeling about turning Martin in?

Feeling? This is Saga we’re talking about – a woman who has to be told to hug someone when they’re distressed. Naturally, her response is completely logical. Martin broke the law and it’s her job to uphold the law. Therefore, she had no choice but to report him. She hopes they are still friends, but she understands if that won’t be the case. She may be out-of-touch with social conventions, but she’s not stupid.

 

What's the crime this time?

A woman is found murdered at a construction site in Malmö, Sweden, with her body left posed as part of a scene depicting a traditional family unit. Once again, it appears someone is going to elaborate lengths to get a point across. But what is that point?

 

How will they keep up the premise of the Danish and Swedish police working together?

It probably would have been a bit much for yet another crime to take place on the actual bridge between the two countries. Instead, it just so happens that the murder victim, Helle Anker, lives in Denmark. She was also married to a Swedish woman, which makes that murder scene all the more pointed. Once again, the two nation’s police departments are going to have to cooperate to crack the case.

 

So will Saga get a new partner?

Yes, and things couldn’t be frostier between Saga and her assigned partner, Hanne Thomsen (Kirsten Olesen). Does Hanne hold a grudge against Saga for Martin’s imprisonment? She claims not to, so maybe she’s just not a very nice person. The friction actually works well and it’s a great twist to the formula to see two strong female cops teamed up.

Who else is new this series?

In episode one, we meet two other characters whose connection to the crime is initially unclear. First up, there’s vlogger Lise Frise Andersen (Sonja Richter), who’s called to her daughter’s school and makes it clear she won’t tolerate her child being bullied. She’s not someone you mess with, it appears. Then, there’s Henrik Sabroe (Thure Lindhardt), who has an interesting personal life – seemingly permitted by the partner he lives with to juggle both their relationship and extra-curricular affairs.

Will we find out more about Saga's past?

Why yes, we will. We’ll hear a new spin on the story we’ve been told about Saga’s troubled family background when her mother turns up out of the blue. If you thought the detective was abrupt with people she has only a casual acquaintance with, wait until you see how she interacts with her mum.

 

Most importantly, is Saga still running around solving crimes in those leather pants?

She might be making an effort to become more in touch with her emotions and those of the people around her, but there are some things you can rely on. Like Sarah Lund’s knitted jumper in The Killing, Saga wouldn’t be herself without her skin-tight trousers, her sports car and her tendency to get changed in the middle of the station.

 

The Bridge returns for series three on Thursday, 14 January at 9:30pm on SBS.

Watch episodes after they air OnDemand here.

 

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