Coming Up Mon 9:00 PM  AEST
Coming Up Live in 
Live
Punjabi radio

How business and leisure travel will change after the pandemic

Tourists wearing facemasks as a preventive measure against the spread of coronavirus Source: Sipa USA Adisorn Chabsungnoen / SOPA Imag

Tourism Australia's 2021 $9 million dollar 'Epic Holidays' campaign encouraged Australians to enjoy the benefits of a domestic holiday. But the reality is most of us have had no other choice - with international borders closed as the COVID pandemic continues to affect life around the world.

Australian Bureau of Statistics data from June 2021 showed departures decreased by 94.5 per cent when compared with pre-COVID levels in June 2019.  

Dr David Beirman is a senior lecturer in tourism at the University of Technology Sydney.

"Prior to 2020, most people thought, particularly in developed countries, that they had a right to travel internationally. That right disappeared after COVID in many, many countries in the world, including Australia."

ABS data from June 2021 also showed there were just 150,970 visitors to Australia a drop of 97.7 per cent from 2020. This saw revenue from the international tourism sector drop by 96.1 per cent.

Beyond leisure travel, COVID-19 restrictions also fundamentally affected the lives of migrants in Australia. Migration to Australia fell dramatically since the beginning of the pandemic but is expected to bounce back in 2022.

Travel for educational and business purposes has also dramatically changed because of COVID.

Dr Sinnerbrink says employers are wary of endorsing travel because of worries about insurance and liability.As to what the long-term effects of the pandemic might be on this kind of travel for study, work and conference participation?

Dr Sinnerbrink says conference travel, face-to-face meetings, long regarded as a key feature of collaborative work in all sorts of areas, are all looking more and more like a luxury.

"I mean, we can do an awful lot, remotely. And it's been quite incredible, to see how quickly people adapted. I know within the education sector, both high school teachers and university teachers had to pivot, as they say very quickly, and become used to, fully online kind of teaching and learning. But, you know, as people often point out, there's a lot that isn't quite captured in that virtual experience. There's a lot of communication that happens more readily in a face-to-face environment, there are all those little informal meetings and spaces and conversations that happen, say at a conference. People often say the most interesting and important conversations happen after the presentation, not necessarily during the presentation."

Click on the player at the top of the page to listen to this information in Punjabi.

SBS is committed to informing Australia’s diverse communities about the latest COVID-19 developments. News and information is available in 63 languages at https://www.sbs.com.au/language/coronavirus

Listen to SBS Punjabi Monday to Friday at 9 pm. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

 

Coming up next

# TITLE RELEASED TIME MORE
How business and leisure travel will change after the pandemic 17/01/2022 13:09 ...
SBS Punjabi Australia News: Friday 20 May 2022 20/05/2022 13:47 ...
'ਵੀਜ਼ਾ ਦਿੱਤਾ ਨਹੀਂ ਬਲਕਿ ਵੇਚਿਆ ਜਾ ਰਿਹਾ ਹੈ': ਪੇਰੈਂਟ ਵੀਜ਼ਾ ਫੈਡਰਲ ਚੋਣਾਂ ਵਿੱਚ ਬਣਿਆ ਅਹਿਮ ਮੁੱਦਾ 20/05/2022 31:10 ...
‘What matters most’: Scott Morrison addresses community concerns over parent visa 20/05/2022 31:08 ...
ਫੈਡਰਲ ਚੋਣਾਂ 2022: ਚੋਣ ਮੁਹਿੰਮ ਦੇ ਆਖਰੀ ਦਿਨਾਂ 'ਚ ਤਨਖ਼ਾਹ ਦਰ ਵਧਾਉਣ ਦਾ ਮੁੱਦਾ ਭਖਿਆ 20/05/2022 06:34 ...
ਫੈਡਰਲ ਚੋਣਾਂ 2022: ਗੱਠਜੋੜ ਦੀ 'ਘਰ ਖਰੀਦਣ ਲਈ ਸੁਪਰ ਦੀ ਵਰਤੋਂ' ਵਾਲ਼ੀ ਯੋਜਨਾ ਦੀ ਵਿਰੋਧੀ ਧਿਰ ਵੱਲੋਂ ਆਲੋਚਨਾ 20/05/2022 08:10 ...
Federal election 2022: Meet Greenway's independent candidate Lovepreet Singh Nanda 20/05/2022 08:48 ...
ਫੈਡਰਲ ਚੋਣਾਂ 2022: ਭਾਈਚਾਰੇ ਨਾਲ ਜੁੜੇ ਮਹੱਤਵਪੂਰਨ ਮੁੱਦਿਆਂ ਬਾਰੇ ਮੁੱਖ ਸਿਆਸੀ ਪਾਰਟੀਆਂ ਨਾਲ਼ ਸੁਆਲ-ਜੁਆਬ 20/05/2022 31:00 ...
Campaign day dominated by the latest wage figures 20/05/2022 06:34 ...
SBS Punjabi Australia News: Thursday 19 May 2022 19/05/2022 07:30 ...
View More