Coming Up Fri 9:00 PM  AEDT
Coming Up Live in 
Live
Punjabi radio
SBS PUNJABI

One person is displaced every second by our warming planet. Where will they go?

Rohingya Muslim women, who crossed over from Myanmar into Bangladesh, stand holding their sick children. Source: AP

Rising sea levels, fires, floods and other disasters will increasingly leave people with no choice but to move. But where will they go? Under what laws and policies? And with what protections? It's these questions that will be asked at a three-day international conference this week.

As leaders debate the key target to reduce greenhouse emissions to net zero by 2050, there's another daunting milestone that date represents. According to the World Bank, by then climate change would have forced no fewer than 216 million people across six world regions to relocate.

But with concerted action now, it estimates the scale of climate migration could be reduced by as much as 80 percent.

The Kaldor Centre for International Refugee Law is hosting a conference addressing the questions of global warming displacement.

Centre director Professor Jane McAdam says it's an issue that's close to home.

"We know already that 80 per cent of disaster-related displacement over the past decade has occurred within the south Asia Pacific region. So that's millions and millions of people and last year, for example, globally, there were 31 million people displaced by the impact of a disaster."

With no legal definition of a climate refugee, establishing those legal frameworks, according to Jane McAdam, is a key sticking point -particularly in this region, where rising sea levels and more frequent extreme weather events are posing existential threats to the residents of pacific islands.

"We don't yet have clear international legal frameworks that would facilitate movement. In some parts of the world, in Africa for example, there are free movement agreements between certain countries or groups of countries, that mean people can move freely but we don't yet have anything like that in the Pacific, other than the trans-Tasman agreement that allows Australians and New Zealanders to move relatively freely."

Click on the player at the top of the page to listen to the feature in Punjabi.

SBS is committed to informing Australia’s diverse communities about the latest COVID-19 developments. News and information is available in 63 languages at https://www.sbs.com.au/language/coronavirus

Listen to SBS Punjabi Monday to Friday at 9 pm. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

 

Coming up next

# TITLE RELEASED TIME MORE
One person is displaced every second by our warming planet. Where will they go? 25/10/2021 08:30 ...
'83' is not just a movie, but a tribute to the iconic moment in cricket history, says Ranveer Singh 03/12/2021 05:00 ...
India Diary: Akali Dal leader Manjinder Singh Sirsa joins BJP, resigns as Delhi gurdwara body chief 03/12/2021 08:15 ...
'The evolution of a cricket fan': Professor explores his immigrant journey through the sport 03/12/2021 11:10 ...
It's forty years since HIV was first discovered in the United States 03/12/2021 08:00 ...
SBS Punjabi Australia News: Thursday 2 Dec 2021 02/12/2021 10:54 ...
Report reveals in children growing up in Australia at a financial, economic, and linguistic disadvantage 02/12/2021 07:50 ...
SBS Punjabi Australia News: Wednesday 1st Dec 2021 01/12/2021 10:00 ...
Canberra's workplace culture revealed in new report 01/12/2021 07:33 ...
Entering Australia: what you can and cannot bring 01/12/2021 10:35 ...
View More