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This migrant entrepreneur started his blog for $35 and sold it for $35 million

Source: Twitter

Ten years ago, at the age of 21, he started a blog about cars from the spare bedroom of his parents’ home in Brisbane.

31-year-old Alborz Fallah came to Australia from Iran when he was nine years old.

Ten years ago, at the age of 21, he started a blog about cars from the spare bedroom of his parents’ home in Brisbane.

This blog over years grew into a website called Car Advice.

Fallah invested $35 to buy the domain. “I’ve always loved cars and always wanted to do something in the car space. I couldn’t believe a domain as good as caradvice.com.au still existed in 2006. So I registered the domain and got going. Six months later, I was joined by my co-founder Anthony Crawford,” he told smartcompany.com.au in 2015.

The website reviews cars on the market and gives honest and reliable advice to potential customers. “Our job is to connect the right customer to the right car,” Fallah said.

On Thursday, Newscorp reported that his $35 investment yield him one million per cent return when Channel Nine bought his website for $35 million.

Car Advice employs close to 40 staff and has an estimated turnover of $15 million a year, Daily Telegraph wrote.

Car Advice’s shareholders on Thursday accepted an offer from Nine Digital.

Fallah’s tips for other entrepreneurs: (Source: Smart Company)

Fail early and fail as many times as you can – ‘You’ve just got to keep trying and the one that will work will be the one you’re most passionate about.’

Change the rules of the game – ‘Previously, car journos would go to the launch of a car and publish the story in a week. We started putting a rule in place that we would have a story up in 24 hours.’

Keep going, no matter what – ‘We’ve had legal letters and whatever you can think of from our competition to try to scare us, shut us off and make us go away. We didn’t think anything of it – we just kept going because we could see we were growing and they weren’t.’