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Ep.197: Costruire i legami tra i bambini e la Terra attraverso le canzoni

Samantha Jackson and her child, Benjamin, singing their lullaby. Source: Peta Doherty

Il Progetto Ninnananna è un programma internazionale che aiuta le donne incinte ed i neo-genitori di tutto il mondo a scrivere e cantare ninnenanne personalizzate per i propri bambini, con l’aiuto di musicisti professionisti.

SCARICA la trascrizione col testo a fronte in inglese.  

Italian

Il Progetto Ninnananna è un programma internazionale che aiuta le donne incinte ed i neo-genitori di tutto il mondo a scrivere e cantare ninnenanne personalizzate per i propri bambini, con l’aiuto di musicisti professionisti. 

Samantha Jackson with her two older girls singing to baby musicians ‘You are strong and you know your truth. Don’t be afraid to connect to your roots, you’re great Nan had to hide, you’re safe now to finally uncover... 

Una ninnananna struggente, scritta per aiutare un piccolo bambino Wiradjuri a creare un legame con le sue origini aborigene. 

La mamma del piccolo Benjamin, Samantha Jackson, e le sue due sorelle più grandi sono accompagnate sul palco da alcuni musicisti, cantandogli una serenata con la sua canzone speciale. 

“We’ve included his Nan in it because that’s the line that he’s come down, and I’ve included the totems which is the animal each clan is supposed to protect and is protected by, so we’ve included the wedgetail eagle and the crow. One's for the females and one's for the males. I want him to feel connected to his culture, and not be ashamed or anything from it. Just feel happy about it and have that strong connection to it, not hide away from it.”   

Jackson è parte di un gruppo di genitori e parenti che hanno scritto e registrato la propria ninnananna con l’aiuto di musicisti professionisti durante una serie di seminari a Mount Barker, nelle Adelaide Hills. 

Daeya Stir è una donna Narrunga e una parente che fa parte del programma. 

“I was able to write a song (laughs) so that was good because I don’t write - so just the fact that we created a song ourselves, and  what that song was about was a big achievement in itself..  Even being Indigenous myself, it was still great to write a song, about culture to connect with baby.” 

Tuntun Polar – parola in lingua Ngarrindjeri che significa dormire – è il nome di un programma pilota a cura di Lullaby Project Australia in collaborazone con The Willow Children’s Centre.  

Il Progetto Ninnananna è iniziato 10 anni fa alla Carnegie Hall di New York. 

Questo progetto aiuta le famiglie a creare ninnenanne personalizzate con musicisti professionisti. 

Emily Gann lo ha portato in Australia in collaborazione con Carnegie Hall nel 2019. 

“Ultimately our dream is for every child in the country to be born with a lullaby written for them. Each project we do is really really unique, so it’s about finding the right people, to sit around a table, and dream up what we can achieve,  making each project really bespoke for the community that we're working with, whether it be in a mental healthcare setting or in a community centre.” 

Ha detto che il progetto pilota Tuntun Polar ha responsabilizzato i partecipanti. 

“I think this one is particularly special, because the way it empowers people -  a lot of people may never have written a song, or may not believe that they're musical that as soon as you take them on this journey and have a professional artist support them through the process, it's suddenly this realization that actually, I have this innate creativity in me and I have this this incredible power to tell a story to my child.” 

Nel programma, i partecipanti hanno creato insieme una ninnananna per la loro comunità. 

Il consulente sulla cultura aborigena del progetto, Lorelle Hunter, ha detto che questo programma ha rafforzato i legami tra i genitori adottivi ed i loro figli aborigeni. 

“To let the little ones grow up knowing, they are Aboriginal, and that they are all shades of deadly. Even though, they might not know who their ancestors are, the ancestors know who they are.” 

Questo progetto ha aiutato anche genitori non aborigeni come Megan Johns a creare un legame con il patrimonio culturale di suo figlio. 

“I’ve been able to research and learn more so I can so I can hopefully raise him knowing who he is, and being connected, and I think if anyone has this opportunity it’s a fantastic opportunity for everyone.” 

English

Samantha Jackson with her two older girls singing to baby musicians ‘You are strong and you know your truth. Don’t be afraid to connect to your roots, you’re great Nan had to hide, you’re safe now to finally uncover. 

A heartfelt lullaby written to help a small Wiradjuri boy connect with his Indigenous roots.

Baby Benjamin's mother Samantha Jackson and his two older sisters are accompanied by musicians on stage, serenading him with his very own song. 

“We’ve included his Nan in it because that’s the line that he’s come down, and I’ve included the totems which is the animal each clan is supposed to protect and is protected by, so we’ve included the wedgetail eagle and the crow. One's for the females and one's for the males. I want him to feel connected to his culture, and not be ashamed or anything from it. Just feel happy about it and have that strong connection to it, not hide away from it.”   

Ms Jackson is one of a group of parents and kinship carers who have written and recorded their own lullaby with the help of professional musicians during a series of workshops in Mount Barker, in the Adelaide Hills. 

Daeya Stir is a Narrunga woman and kinship carer who is also part of the program. 

“I was able to write a song (laughs) so that was good because I don’t write - so just the fact that we created a song ourselves, and  what that song was about was a big achievement in itself..  Even being Indigenous myself, it was still great to write a song, about culture to connect with baby.” 

Tuntun Polar – a Ngarrindjeri word for sleeping - is a pilot program by Lullaby Project Australia in collaboration with The Willow Children’s Centre. 

The Lullaby Project started ten years ago in New York’s Carnegie Hall. 

It supports families to create personalised lullabies for their children with professional musicians. 

Emily Gann brought it to Australia in a partnership with Carnegie Hall in 2019. 

“Ultimately our dream is for every child in the country to be born with a lullaby written for them. Each project we do is really really unique, so it’s about finding the right people, to sit around a table, and dream up what we can achieve,  making each project really bespoke for the community that we're working with, whether it be in a mental healthcare setting or in a community centre.” 

She says the Tuntun Polar pilot has empowered participants. 

“I think this one is particularly special, because the way it empowers people -  a lot of people may never have written a song, or may not believe that they're musical that as soon as you take them on this journey and have a professional artist support them through the process, it's suddenly this realization that actually, I have this innate creativity in me and I have this this incredible power to tell a story to my child.” 

As part of the program participants crafted a joint lullaby for their community. 

The program’s Aboriginal cultural consultant, Lorelle Hunter, says it has strengthened foster carers’ connection with their Indigenous child. 

“To let the little ones grow up knowing, they are Aboriginal, and that they are all shades of deadly. Even though, they might not know who their ancestors are, the ancestors know who they are.” 

It’s also helped non-Indigenous parents like Megan Johns connect to their child’s cultural heritage. 

“I’ve been able to research and learn more so I can so I can hopefully raise him knowing who he is, and being connected, and I think if anyone has this opportunity it’s a fantastic opportunity for everyone.” 

Report by Peta Doherty

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