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Episodio #42: Viaggiare nel proprio paese

Sollten wir als Tourist den mysteriösen Felsen besteigen - oder besser in Ruhe lassen? Source: 500px

Ci sono 1004 turisti che arrivano ogni ora in Australia per esplorare il nostro enorme e diverso continente.

Slow Italian, Fast Learning, il meglio dei nostri servizi della settimana, letti più lentamente e più scanditi, con i testi in italiano e in inglese.

Italian

Mentre sempre più "baby boomers” cercano di raggiungere tutte le loro mete desiderate oltreoceano, ci sono 1004 turisti che arrivano ogni ora in Australia per esplorare il nostro enorme e diverso continente.

Janka Weis, di German Australian Travel, da anni prenota vacanze ad Uluru per turisti.

Il sogno di Weis è un giorno di andare nel luoghi sacro delle popolazioni Yankunytjatjara e Pitjantjatjara, visitati ogni anno da più di 150mila persone.

“I would go into the desert resort or I would go to the dinner of silence, okay. I have heard so much about it and definitely the dinner is outside literally in the desert, and you just have got your table prepared for you and for the group in the desert, the experience and the stars and everything is just breathtaking, and, of course, the walk, the cultural walk around Uluru to feel the energy and the pulse of Australia of course that’s what I think what it’s all about.”

I dati più recenti dell'Australian Bureau of Statistics mostrano che il numero di "baby boomers" che viaggia oltreoceano è aumentato di più dell'80% negli ultimi cinque anni.

Sara Birtwhistle, di 50 Plus Travel Club, nota che la maggior parte dei suoi clienti tra i 50 e i 70 anni tende a preferire i viaggi all'estero finché ancora in forma ed in salute.

“I find that people travelling in Australia is what they might do when they are a little bit older when they can’t do that long travel anymore, but I always think what a shame, because it is the continent here of exploration, we shouldn’t be leaving it till we’re too long in the tooth. You wanna get out and be able to walk in canyons, it’s gorgeous, beautiful oasis in the middle of a canyon that you can hike up to the top to see.”

Se siete preoccupati di rimanere intrappolati in una nave, Birtwhistle suggerisce di fare un viaggio in treno di quattro giorni da Darwin ad Adelaide a bordo del celebre Ghan, per un’esperienza più totalizzante.

Con il suo 90esimo anniversario in arrivo, Sara consiglia di prenotare in anticipo per assicurarsi un posto per il percorso di 2979 chilometri.  

“It does go to Coober Pedy so if you think about those underground homes that they do stop on that journey, and the train is such a fun experience, you get to share a four night trip on and off train experiences. So, for a morning, you might go out to Katherine gorge and see that and certainly from a travel point of view, it’s a very easy option to just hop on a train in Darwin, head down for a couple of hours, hop off in Katherine, have a nice couple of hours off, see the beautiful Katherine and then you head on down to Alice Springs, and so the whole way through you’re seeing the red centre, which, of course, most people know but never get to see it.”

Molti dei viaggiatori 0ver 50 di Janka Weis sono pronti ad esplorare le bellezze delle isole australiane.

Tra le destinazioni preferite, troviamo Hamilton Island, Norfolk Island e Fraser Island - la più grande isola sabbiosa del mondo.

Tracy Rivers di National Seniors Travel raccomanda la Tasmania.

Un recente sondaggio della Roy Morgan ha rivelato che la capitale Hobart è la destinazione di viaggio domestica più in crescita della nazione.

Si è classificata come terza città più gettonata come meta di vacanza dopo Melbourne e Sydney.

“Tasmania is a wonderful destination. It offers varied things. It has amazing history with Port Arthur and some of the penal colonies that were there at that time. There’s also Richmond Bridge, which is an amazing bridge that’s there, also Tasmania is known for its food and wine. Even though it’s a small place there’s a lot to see and do.”

Non tutti però possono permettersi il tempo ed il denaro per visitare posti esotici.

Secondo Bronwyn White, anche guidare semplicemente per un'ora o due nell'Australia regionale può portare ad interessanti scoperte culturali.

“In and around Sydney even you can do some Indigenous tours not far from Sydney or you can go anywhere out bush and then a bit out the outback but there’s some really fabulous and interesting local museums in regional areas and cultural experiences that you can have. I mean going to the pub and having a lunch at some of those place is a cultural experience. It’s at those places that you get to meet some really interesting people and you’re near hospitals, you’re safe and you’re at home.”

English

As more and more baby boomers are looking to tick off their bucket list in overseas travels, there are 1004 tourists arriving in Australia every hour to explore our vast and diverse landscape.

Janka Weis from German Australian Travel has been booking tourists to Uluru for many years.

Weis dreams of one day going to the sacred place of the Yankunytjatjara and Pitjantjatjara people visited by over 250,000 people each year.

“I would go into the desert resort or I would go to the dinner of silence, okay. I have heard so much about it and definitely the dinner is outside literally in the desert, and you just have got your table prepared for you and for the group in the desert, the experience and the stars and everything is just breathtaking, and, of course, the walk, the cultural walk around Uluru to feel the energy and the pulse of Australia of course that’s what I think what it’s all about.”

Recent Australian Bureau of Statistics data shows that the number of baby boomers travelling overseas has increased by more than 80 per cent in the past five years.

Sara Birtwhistle from the 50 Plus Travel Club finds that most of her clients aged between fifties to seventies tend to have their eyes set on overseas trips while they’re still fit and active.

“I find that people travelling in Australia is what they might do when they are a little bit older when they can’t do that long travel anymore, but I always think what a shame, because it is the continent here of exploration, we shouldn’t be leaving it till we’re too long in the tooth. You wanna get out and be able to walk in canyons, it’s gorgeous, beautiful oasis in the middle of a canyon that you can hike up to the top to see.”

f you’re worried about being trapped on a ship, Birtwhistle suggests going on the four-day train ride from Darwin to Adelaide on the infamous Ghan expedition for a more immersive experience.

With its 90th anniversary coming up, she advises booking early to guarantee a spot on the 2,979km train ride. 

“It does go to Coober Pedy so if you think about those underground homes that they do stop on that journey, and the train is such a fun experience, you get to share a four night trip on and off train experiences. So, for a morning, you might go out to Katherine gorge and see that and certainly from a travel point of view, it’s a very easy option to just hop on a train in Darwin, head down for a couple of hours, hop off in Katherine, have a nice couple of hours off, see the beautiful Katherine and then you head on down to Alice Springs, and so the whole way through you’re seeing the red centre, which, of course, most people know but never get to see it.”

Many of Janka Weis’ fifty plus travellers are keen to explore the beauty of Australian islands.

Among the favourite destinations are Hamilton Island, Norfolk Island, and Fraser Island - the largest sand island in the world. 

Tracy Rivers from National Seniors Travel recommends Tasmania.

A recent Roy Morgan survey finds that the state’s capital, Hobart, is the country’s fastest growing domestic travel destination.

It’s ranked the third most desired holiday city in Australia after Melbourne and Sydney.

“Tasmania is a wonderful destination. It offers varied things. It has amazing history with Port Arthur and some of the penal colonies that were there at that time. There’s also Richmond Bridge, which is an amazing bridge that’s there, also Tasmania is known for its food and wine. Even though it’s a small place there’s a lot to see and do.”

Not everyone can afford the time and money to visit exotic places.

Bronwyn White says sometimes simply driving an hour or two into regional Australia can lead to interesting cultural experiences. 

“In and around Sydney even you can do some Indigenous tours not far from Sydney or you can go anywhere out bush and then a bit out the outback but there’s some really fabulous and interesting local museums in regional areas and cultural experiences that you can have. I mean going to the pub and having a lunch at some of those place is a cultural experience. It’s at those places that you get to meet some really interesting people and you’re near hospitals, you’re safe and you’re at home.”

Story by Amy Chien-Yu Wang

Ascolta SBS Italian tutti i giorni, dalle 8am alle 10am. Seguici su FacebookTwitter e Instagram.

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