• "Hidden Fence" by The Late Show with Stephen Colbert (CBS)Source: CBS
"The movie white people at the Golden Globes were talking about."
By
reuters.com

Source:
Variety
11 Jan 2017 - 10:04 AM  UPDATED 11 Jan 2017 - 10:04 AM

One of the most cringeworthy moments from the Golden Globes was when "Today" correspondent Jenna Bush Hager congratulated Pharrell Williams on his film "Hidden Fences".

Relive the red carpet flub below.

 

 

Presenter Michael Keaton made the same mistake when presenting the Best Supporting Actress in a Motion Picture nominee Octavia Spencer.

The correct title of Williams' and Spencer's film is Hidden Figures, not Hidden Fences.

The funny folks over at "The Late Show with Stephen Colbert" decided to parody the gaffes by mashing up the two predominantly African American films – Hidden Figures and Fences.

The parody trailer opens describing Hidden Fences as "the movie white people at the Golden Globes were talking about."

Fences director/star Denzel Washington is then seen passionately arguing that a fence cannot go into space. (Figures tells the story of three black female mathematicians aiding NASA in the space race).

A voiceover continues: "Based on the true story of people who think all movies about black people are the same movie. Starring: Black actors, black actresses, Kevin Costner, and introducing a Fence."

After the Globes, both Hager and Keaton apologised for their mistakes.

Watch the clip below:

 

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