• 'Flavour Swap' where top chefs share recipes with new Australians. (SBS)Source: SBS
Over three nights, SBS brings you 14 short films looking at the diverse, moving and sometimes hilarious lives of Australians.
By
Anthony Morris

14 Sep 2019 - 9:08 AM  UPDATED 15 Sep 2019 - 10:24 AM

Welcome to Day 3 of the inaugural SBS Short Film Festival – the cutting-edge film festival you can watch from your couch. It has been a wonderful two days so far, and this third day gives us just as much to enjoy.

With four scripted and 10 non-scripted short-form productions dropping exclusively at SBS On Demand over three days, it’s a celebration of diversity and the short film form. Featuring Australian creatives from communities that are underrepresented on our screens, the opening night includes Out of Range, starring Australian actor and TV Week Logie nominee Aaron Pedersen.

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SBS Short Film Festival program: Day 2, Saturday 14 September
Over three nights, SBS brings you 14 short films looking at the diverse, moving and sometimes hilarious lives of Australians.
SBS Short Film Festival program: Day 1, Friday 13 September
Over three nights, SBS brings you 14 short films looking at the diverse, moving and sometimes hilarious lives of Australians.

A partnership between SBS and five Australian screen agencies – Film Victoria, Screen Queensland, Screenwest, South Australian Film Corporation and Screen Tasmania – brings these short films to audiences. It’s a festival that’s truly national in scope.

Running from 13­–15 September, here’s what you can expect on Day 3: Sunday 15 September.

Tribunal 

By director Mason Fleming, writer Alex Morrison and producer Hannah Ngo

Having fled Afghanistan after being caught with a man, Javad (Mansoor Noor) faces a barrage of increasingly embarrassing questions from a tribunal trying to prove he’s not gay enough to be granted asylum. The only person who can help him is his translator – but how far is she willing to go? 

Amar

Written and directed by Fatima Mawa 

Twenty-eight-year-old Muslim woman Amar (Kate Barakis) is secretly planning the wedding of her dreams. There may be a few obstacles in her way – she has Down syndrome and there’s no groom in sight – and her family struggles with discrimination on a daily basis. Still, she’s determined to achieve her dream and get the recognition from her community that she deserves. 

Lost Daylight

Directed and produced by Callan Murray and Nurdewi Djamal

At age 12 Isobel (Dawn) Daylight was taken from her family and placed in Brisbane’s Sisters of Mercy convent within the prestigious girl’s school, All Hallows’. There she was made to work without pay and didn’t receive the benefits of being formally enrolled. Her sisters Carol and Margaret suffered similar fates in 1950s and ’60s Queensland; now Isobel tells her story for the first time. 

Lives in Action

By directors Lillian Paterson and Hawanatu Bangura and producer Chloe Lawrence-Hartcher

How do different cultures grapple with disability? How do disabled individuals face and surmount the barriers put in their way by Australian society? These are just some of the questions posed and answered by the six disabled Australians at the heart of Lives in Action. Interviewed by a group of neurodiverse filmmakers, they shine a light on expectations, stereotypes, and the ways culture can help as well as hinder.

Flavour Swap

Produced by Ella Kennedy and Catherine Pettman

It’s a culinary culture clash as Tasmania’s top chefs meet passionate home cooks from the local migrant and refugee community to swap recipes and share their favourite flavours. Vince Trim, Executive Chef at Mona, is matched up with Liberian refugees Judy and Victoria, while Oskar Rossi and Federica Andrisani from Hobart Italian bistro Fico get a crash course in Indian cuisine from Muslim mother and aspiring chef Sumaiya.

 

Follow the author here: @morrbeat