Housos vs Authority must be good because the producers made a sequel, Pizza vs Housos, now showing in cinemas. See the original at 8.30pm on Saturday (SBS ONE).
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4 Dec 2014 - 9:55 AM  UPDATED 26 Mar 2015 - 11:43 AM

The film is flat out hilarious. Here's a few reasons why:

You can check your snobbery at the door

A friend of mine accuses me of reverse snobbery, in part because he knows I think he's a snob even though I'm too polite to say. I tend to be condescending towards the rich and privileged, whereas he tends to not give the poor and uneducated the time of day. He'd hate Housos vs Authority; I love it because it's cinematic proof that the smart, the hilarious, the larger than life, the confident -- and the rat cunning -- can be found not just on the right side of the tracks but among the junkies, bogans, bikies and gangs.

Try to keep up

There's an energy to the film that's irresistible and irrepressible.

It's beautifully Australian, in every way, including:

  • The character names: Shazza and Kazza, Wazza and Bazza, Kylie and Franky, Rayleen and Beryl, and so on and so on. It's beautifully Australian.
  • The director Paul Fenech has made his own character, Franky Falzoni, the  local stud who regularly takes on two ladies at once, but they're the most unsexy sex scenes in the history of cinema and Franky is always showing his bum cheeks.
  • We get to hear from the real Chopper Read.
  • Because of what the emu does.
  • Shazza's mum may have died and death is not a laughing matter but when her ashes end up in an ugg boot that definitely tickles the funny bone. It might not be the same for those not familiar with Australian culture though because familiarity drives a lot of the laughs.
  • The repetition of the line "Shut up I can't see the TV".
  • The thong slapping.
  • The nature of the interactions with the police - and these scenes are admirable for their originality.

Sequels rule OK

Housos vs Authority should be celebrated because it is a rare thing when an Aussie movie sparks a sequel, especially on the indie film front. It's not unheard of -- think Alvin Purple, Crocodile Dundee, Wolf Creek -- but it's also not common. Fat Pizza vs Housos went into cinemas last week. Fury Road is heading our way soon and Blue Dog is in planning. It may be too soon to pronounce a trend towards sequels but it is a healthy sign.