On a return flight from Berlin to New York with her husband\'s coffin, an aircraft engineer (Jodie Foster) sees things go from bad to worse when her six-year-old daughter goes missing. Told that there was no record of her daughter having boarded the flight, she question her sanity while continuing the search.

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Flightplan almost gets to its destination but takes a big fat nosedive about half way through, throwing in some lame references to racial panic post-9/11.

Starring Jodie Foster, Flightplan is another Panic Room only this one�s at 30 000 feet! In it she plays Kyle Pratt, a recently widowed mother en route from Berlin to New York with the body of her husband on board. Also in tow is her young daughter Julia (Marlene Lawston), so traumatised by the loss of her dad her mum must carry her on to the plane. Kyle�s already having a bad day when the unthinkable happens: Julia goes missing during the flight. Consequently all hell breaks loose, but mainly for Kyle as no-one seems to remember Julia ever being on the plane with her. The game of the film therefore becomes \'is Kyle a grief-stricken delusional� or is she somehow up to no good? This is an interesting movie failure where I wound up actually being more interested in how the extras were acting than the main players. En masse their function was to almost act as a gallery in a courtroom, silently and collectively casting their verdict as to whether Foster�s character is a crazy lady, or should have our sympathy or not. Foster�s performance seemed tweaked a little too early towards hysterical to be convincing, while her occupation as an aircraft designer just a little too convenient to serve the credibility of the story. The presence of Peter Saarsgard in any film is always welcome although the level of menace in his voice is a bit of a tip off as to how things might play out as air marshall Carson. British actor Sean Bean (Lord Of The Rings) and Australian Kate Beahan also put in good performances in their support flight crew roles.Flightplan almost gets to its destination but takes a big fat nosedive about half way through, throwing in some lame references to racial panic post-9/11. Wes Craven�s recent thriller Red Eye is the better \'air panic movie for 2005, and as a complete piece, leaves Flightplan on the tarmac.