Jake, a criminal in cahoots with corrupt LA cops, hits pay dirt but in doing so finds himself on the wrong side of a crime boss known as The King.

3.5
Tasty thriller, distinguished by a wonderfully creepy yet perversely funny performance, from Hoffman

Jake Vig, Ed Burns, is a successful con-man but, when he and his gang rip-off an associate of crime boss King, Dustin Hoffman, they know they\'re in very big trouble. Jake goes to see King to straighten things out and agrees to pull off a major con: the swindle of a money launderer called Morgan Price, Robert Forster. King insists that one of his close associates, Lupus, Frankie G, come in on the scam, which is being operated by Jake\'s regular gang members, Miles, Brian Van Holt, and Gordo, Paul Giametti, with the help of new addition Lily, Rachel Weisz. The screenplay for Confidence, written by Doug Jung, is pretty convoluted; just as you think you\'ve got it all worked out, the ground moves under your feet. Director James Foley starts the proceedings with a nod to Billy Wilder and Sunset Blvd. as the character of Jake, well and truly dead, tells in flashback how he got to be in this situation in the first place. It\'s a tasty enough thriller, distinguished by a wonderfully creepy yet perversely funny performance, from Dustin Hoffman as the crime boss; it\'s one of this gifted actor\'s finest roles. Andy Garcia makes a rather fleeting appearance as a federal cop, while Luiz Guzman and Donal Logue have more to get their teeth into as a pair of corrupt cops. Confidence is pretty stylish, and generally a notch above the average crime thriller.