Inspired by the true events that took place in Papua New Guinea, 1942. A small force of ill-equipped and untrained Australians face off against a force of Japanese fighters, intending to take Port Moresby and subsequently, invade Australia. A bombing campaign cuts the Australians off from their supply and communication lines, and vulnerable to malaria and dysentry. On the brink of collapse, they make their way back through the punishing terrain of the infamous Kokoda track.

3.5
An authentic story of survival in a legendary campaign.

Kokoda is based on the experiences of Australian troops fighting the Japanese in 1942 in New Guinea. A motley crew of what they call chocolate soldiers ' (ill equipped troops that will melt under the conditions) are on forward patrol when they are cut off from the rest of their battalion.

The real power lies in its ability to show the suffering and agony that these young men went through in our name.



Caught behind enemy lines in harsh terrain, Jack Scholt (Jack Finsterer) is trying to maintain command of a small group of men. Suffering from Malaria and dysentery, they are dropping like flies as Scholt's leadership is continuously questioned by Darko Moey (Travis McMahon).

Kokoda doesn't hold back from the grim realities of front line warfare. Using hand held cameras and close up photography the humidity, mud and suffocating paranoia are vividly conveyed. Due to budgetary restriction the director and writer were forced scale down the story, concentrating primarily on the trials and tribulations of one lost patrol.

I kept thinking this should have been a much bigger production due to the epic nature of this legendary battle, however that's doesn't detract from the ensemble cast who capably portray the tension of this struggle. The real power of Kokoda lies in its ability to show the suffering and agony that these young men went through in our name.