An American chemist heads to London with the intention of selling his new party drug to an international cartel, in the belief that his crime boss has perished in an accident. His boss has actually survived and promptly dispatched a hired gun to enact revenge.

2.5
This very derivative effort never has time to be actually boring, but it\'s not very inspiring either.

Back in 1971, Elmo McElroy, Samuel L. Jackson, is driving home after receiving his degree in pharmacology when he\'s busted for dope-smoking. It\'s the end of his legitimate career. Thirty years later he has created a powerful new drug for the rave scene, POS-51; he sets off an explosion designed to kill his boss, Lizard, Meat Loaf, and heads for Liverpool, England, to arrange a deal with the local drug czar, Durant, Ricky Tomlinson. But hitwoman Dakota, Emily Mortimer, is after Durant, and Elmo is forced to enter a partnership with local fixer Felix deSouza, Robert Carlyle, to find a new buyer for the drugs.Made in 2001, and originally titled The 51st State, this Guy Ritchie-influenced British-set action film from Ronny Yu is a bit of a mess. The attempt to mix comedy with mayhem is only fitfully successful, and the reliance on four-letter dialogue - which unnecessarily mars so many contemporary films - is dispiriting. A fine cast does what it can to bring some order out of the chaos, and Samuel L. Jackson in a kilt is certainly a sight to behold and Emily Mortimer is a very fetching assassin - but Robert Carlyle is getting less endearing with each new film. With its explosions and shootings and car chases and colorful characters - including Sean Pertwee\'s corrupt cop - this very derivative effort never has time to be actually boring, but it\'s not very inspiring either.