Bad Neighbours disgusting, yet hilarious

Bad Neighbours has heart, but it also stands alongside some incredibly gross and funny gags. And again proves Rose Byrne has some seroius comedy chops.

Rose Byrne continues her comedy streak alongside Seth Rogen in the flick Bad Neighbours, a gross-out comedy about life milestones with some surprisingly original laughs.

The Aussie actress famously proved she had a funny bone in the smash-hit Bridesmaids, following an out-of-nowhere comedic turn in Get Him to the Greek.

Last year, she kept it up with British rom-com I Give It a Year and as a Google worker in The Internship.

Now, in Bad Neighbours she teams up with Rogen as two new parents who begin an over-the-fence war with a group of college guys.

After recently buying a place in the quiet suburb, Kelly (Byrne) and Mac (Rogen) are getting used to their new sleep-deprived life as mum and dad to Stella, their cute baby daughter.

When they see the vacant house next door is going to be a fraternity, led by Teddy (a chiselled Zac Efron) and Pete (Dave Franco), they keep their cool, even partying with them to get them on-side. But it doesn't take long for this neighbourly friendship to turn into all-out war.

As things escalate, Bad Neighbours brings some unexpected new laughs to the tiring gross-out comedy genre, including a whole new insight into breastfeeding that is equally horrendous and hilarious.

Efron and Rogen are incredibly funny together, whether they're getting ripped and bantering about Batman, comparing physiques, trying to hurt each other or having a dance-off. Byrne holds her own, especially when she's manipulating college kids at a house party.

But amid this back-and-forth pranking that makes up much of the film, Bad Neighbours has a lot of heart.

It's about growing up, with every character passing a major stage in their life, whether they like it or not.

Teddy and his college buddies, a group that includes Franco and Superbad's Christopher Mintz-Plasse, are coming to the end of their fraternity life.

Meanwhile, Kelly and Mac are also coming to grips with the fact that they've closed a door to that hard-partying and irresponsible lifestyle now they have Stella.

Director Nicholas Stoller (The Muppets) manages to find a great balance, though.

It means Bad Neighbours has plenty of heart, but it's served up alongside some incredibly disgusting and funny gags.

* Bad Neighbours releases in Australian cinemas on May 8

Source: AAP