North America

China 'very confident' of US trade deal

China says it is confident it can reach agreement with the US on trade and has promised to implement specific issues agreed upon in Argentina.

China has expressed confidence it can reach a trade deal with the United States, a sentiment echoed by US President Donald Trump a day after he warned of more tariffs if the two sides could not resolve their differences.

The remarks by the Chinese Commerce Ministry follow a period of relative quiet from Beijing after Trump and Chinese leader Xi Jinping reached a temporary truce in their trade war at a meeting over dinner in Argentina on Saturday.

In a brief statement, the ministry said China would try to work quickly to implement specific items already agreed upon, as both sides "actively promote the work of negotiations within 90 days in accordance with a clear timetable and road map".

"We are confident in implementation," it said, calling the latest bilateral talks "very successful".

Trump, in a post on Twitter, linked Beijing's silence to officials' travels and said he thought Xi had been sincere during their weekend meeting to hammer out progress over trade.

"Very strong signals being sent by China once they returned home from their long trip, including stops, from Argentina," Trump tweeted on Wednesday.

"Not to sound naive or anything, but I believe President Xi meant every word of what he said at our long and hopefully historic meeting. ALL subjects discussed!"

The US president a day earlier had said the ceasefire could be extended but warned tariffs would be back on the table if the talks failed and that he would only accept a "real deal" with China.

China's Foreign Ministry referred specific questions to the Commerce Ministry, which is due to hold its weekly news briefing on Thursday in Beijing.

"We hope the two working teams from both sides can, based on the consensus reached between the two countries' leaders, strengthen consultations, and reach a mutually beneficial agreement soon," Foreign Ministry spokesman Geng Shuang told reporters.

The threat of further escalation in the trade war between the world's two largest economies has loomed large over financial markets and the global economy for much of the year, and investors initially greeted the ceasefire with relief.

The mood has quickly soured, however, on scepticism that the two sides can reach a substantive deal on a host of highly divisive issues within the 90-day negotiating period.

Markets continued to slide on Wednesday in part from confusion over the ceasefire's lack of detail.

Failure would raise the spectre of a major escalation in the trade battle, with fresh US tariff action and Chinese retaliation possibly as early as March.

The White House has said China had committed to start buying more American products and lifting tariff and non-tariff barriers immediately, while beginning talks on structural changes with respect to forced technology transfers and intellectual property protection.

Sources told Reuters that Chinese oil trader Unipec plans to resume buying US crude by March after the Xi-Trump deal reduced the risk of tariffs on those imports.

China's crude oil imports from the US had ground to a halt.

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