Immigration

'Now your life can start again': Sharrouf children finally reunited with Sydney grandma

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The orphaned children of notorious Islamic State terrorist Khaled Sharrouf have been reunited with their grandma Karen Nettleton.

A harrowing five-year journey came to an end when a Sydney grandma was finally reunited with her surviving grandchildren and great-grandchildren - the children of former IS fighter Khaled Sharrouf.

ABC's Four Corners captured the moment Karen Nettleton saw Zaynab, Hoda and Humzeh Sharrouf and her two great-grandchildren for the first time since they were taken by their mother, Tara Nettleton, to Syria to join their father. 

"I can't believe I'm here with you, I'm pretty sure I'm dreaming," Hoda Sharrouf said, seeing her grandma for the first time.

The orphaned children of notorious Islamic State terrorist Khaled Sharrouf have been reunited with their grandma Karen Nettleton.
The orphaned children of notorious Islamic State terrorist Khaled Sharrouf have been reunited with their grandma Karen Nettleton.
Four Corners / ABC

Hoda was just 11 when she was taken to Syria. 

"You're not dreaming, you're not going to wake up," Ms Nettleton replied.

Earlier this month Hoda had asked the government to help her and her siblings return home.

"It's been so hard," she told her grandma. 

"You've been so brave, I don't know how you did it," Ms Nettleton said. 

"Now your life can start all over again."

Sydney grandma Karen Nettleton meeting her great-grandchildren for the first time.
Sydney grandma Karen Nettleton meeting her great-grandchildren for the first time.
Four Corners / ABC

Her sister Zaynab was also in tears. The 17-year-old is seven-and-a-half months pregnant with her third child and has been diagnosed with severe anaemia. 

In the Syrian refugee camp, Ms Nettleton met her great-grandchildren for the first time, and she was armed with dolls, medicine, and lollies. 

Prime Minister Scott Morrison eventually softened his stance on the children's return to Australia, following numerous appeals. 

Mr Morrison said he was working with the Red Cross to remove the children from Syria, but added that he would not risk lives in the process.

He said if the children were able to get to an Australian embassy they would be given passports.

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