NSW govt 'should change Safe Schools'

File photo.

The NSW education minister is being urged to examine whether recent changes to the controversial Safe Schools program go far enough.

Recent changes made to the Safe Schools anti-bullying program don't go far enough in preventing young people from being sexualised, a NSW parliamentary inquiry has heard.

The program is embedding the sexualisation of children as young as 11 by promoting sex toys, teaching them about homosexuality and exposing them to inappropriate images, the Australian Family Association told the inquiry.

The program, which targets lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender students, was controversially amended last month after a federal government review found a number of lessons and content were inappropriate for children.

AFA spokeswoman Terri Kelleher on Thursday urged the NSW committee looking into the sexualisation of children and young people to scrutinise the program's effect.

"Safe Schools sexualises children and young people to believe that gender is fluid and how you feel, and it's not determined by your wibbly wobbly bits," she said.

She said another area of concern was how the program was teaching young people to get around measures which regulate sexualised imagery on the internet - such as changing their browser history.

Mrs Kelleher called on Education Minister Adrian Piccoli to examine whether the program was sexualising children.

"(Because) the responsibility is to ensure that children and young people are not being prematurely sexualised in government schools," she said.

The conservative group also submitted that sexual education did not necessarily lead to more tolerance and less bullying among young people.

The inquiry heard from youth advocate group Youth Action, which said state legislation and education programs had fallen behind young people's sexual practices.

Current sexting laws needed to be amended so young people wouldn't be criminalised for expressing their sexuality in a healthy manner, Youth Action CEO Katie Acheson argued.

Ms Acheson also called for laws relating to cyber-bullying and revenge porn to be strengthened, including giving NSW Police the power to issue takedown notices for non-consenting content.

The hearing continues.

Source AAP

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