Europe

Women mark 100 years of right to vote in UK

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More than 100,000 women marched through cities across the UK on Sunday, marking 100 years of their right to vote.

Thousands of women from across the globe have marched in the UK, celebrating 100 years of having the right to vote. 

The streets of Belfast, Edinburgh, Cardiff, and London were packed by women who were given a piece of fabric to wear in either green, white or violet - the colours of the suffragette movement.

They were choreographed to appear as a flowing river of colour through the streets.

The women had travelled from all parts of the world, some coming from as far away as New Zealand, just as their ancestors did 100 years ago.

They had arrived to support the British women’s fight for the right to vote.

 Women take part in mass participation artwork 'Processions' to celebrate one hundred years of votes for women
Women take part in mass participation artwork 'Processions' to celebrate one hundred years of votes for women.
Getty

Many were carrying hand-made banners for the 'Processions' event, in collaboration with 100 female artists who worked with local communities to create the banners donned in the marches.

Children, mothers, grandmothers march 

In an extreme show of force and women’s rights, girls as young as 12 marched alongside their mothers and grandmothers, while men also joined the marches.

Fathers accompanied their daughters, while brothers walked alongside mums and sisters.

During the marches, women called for equal pay and representation in all jobs and as a mark of respect for those who fought for equal rights 100 years ago.

Frustrated with years of peaceful campaigning for the vote, Suffragettes were members of women’s organisations in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Women and girls in Belfast, Cardiff, Edinburgh and London wore either green, white or violet, the colours of the suffragette movement.
Women and girls in Belfast, Cardiff, Edinburgh and London wore either green, white or violet, the colours of the suffragette movement.
Getty

A women wearing a 'Houses of Parliament' model hat reacts as she takes part in mass participation artwork 'Processions'.
A women wearing a 'Houses of Parliament' model hat reacts as she takes part in mass participation artwork 'Processions'.
Getty

They adopted militant tactics, chaining themselves to railings, breaking shop windows and blowing up post boxes.

The 1918 Representation of the People Act extended the right to vote in Britain to women over the age of 30 who had a minimum property qualification.

However, it was not until 1928 that women gained the same rights as men with the Equal Franchise Act, which reduced the voting age to 21, regardless of property ownership.

The centennial event was coordinated by 14-18 Now, a five-year art program connecting people with the First World War.  

 

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