• First known picture of a human face is found at the Burrup site in Western Australia. (NITV)Source: NITV
The Burrup Peninsula in the Pilbara region of Western Australia could be preserved if an archaeological site is established there.
By
Craig Quartermaine

27 Jul 2015 - 5:08 PM  UPDATED 27 Jul 2015 - 6:17 PM

The Western Australian government allowed the Burrup Peninsula, known to hold some of the oldest rock carvings in the world, to be deregistered as an Aboriginal Heritage site in early 2015.

But its future could be secured if the plan for a new archaelogical site is carried through.

WA Greens member for Mining and Pastoral Robin Chapple expressed hope in the project.

"Once we see the material further sampled and dated, it will actually start coming up with some really significant dates for this particular site," Mr Chapple said.

"Once we see the material further sampled and dated, it will actually start coming up with some really significant dates for this particular site"

The Burrup Peninsula has long been recognised as the home of some of the oldest and most sacred rock art sites in the world, dating back at least 30,000 years, and Chapple continues to condemn the government's decision to deregister it.

"This is nonsense," Mr Chapple said. "This is one of the most important sites, the reason that it came off the register was that the government used flawed state solicitors office advice which is found to be inappropriate, illegal."