The United Nations’ (UN) International Day of the World's Indigenous People is observed on August 9 each year to promote and protect the rights of the world’s Indigenous peoples. NITV is dedicated to highlight Indigenous stories from this country and across the globe and we are proud and privileged to provide you with 5 inspirational shows that you will love.
5 Aug 2015 - 3:10 PM  UPDATED 10 Aug 2015 - 12:41 PM

The United Nations’ (UN) International Day of the World's Indigenous People is observed on August 9 each year to promote and protect the rights of the world’s Indigenous peoples. NITV is dedicated to highlight Indigenous stories from this country and across the globe and we are proud and privileged to provide you with 5 inspirational shows that you will love.

1. Anatomy, Australia

SISTAGIRL defies stereotypes of what it means to be a beautiful transgender Indigenous Australian today.

 

2. Altiplano, Peru

A former war photographer and her physician husband are caught up in a riot when locals in an Andean village vent their unhappiness with contamination from a nearby mine. A visually striking feature set against the majestic backdrop of the high Andes in Peru. Nominated for Best Film at the 2009 Ghent International Film Festival. Directed by Peter Brosens and Jessica Hope Woodworth, and stars Magaly Solier, Jasmin Tabatabai and Olivier Gourmet. (From Belgium, in Quechua, Spanish, French and English) (Drama) (2009) (Rpt) M (A,L,V)

 

3. The Prophets, New Zealand

This riveting, seven part series reveals the incredible stories of the Maori prophets. Presented as a comprehensive anthology, their lives are a fascinating aspect of NZ history.

 

4. Dreaming Lhasa, Tibet

A young Tibetan woman from New York City comes to Dharamsala, the exile headquarters of the Dalai Lama in India, in search of her roots.

 

5. Kimberley, The Land Of The Wandjina

The Wandjina, spirit guardians of one of the last great wilderness areas on Earth, watch over a land ruled on the coast by some of the most ferocious tides in the world, and in the inland by fresh water, falling water or no water at all. Everything in the Kimberley in northwest Australia has adapted to live with the cycles of running water and extremes of wet and dry, and to survive the long periods of drought between the torrential monsoon rains.