• Clarice Greenup (centre), aunt of Evelyn Greenup, one of the victims of the Bowraville murders, is comforted by Raymond Robinson (left) and Marg Campbell (AAP)Source: AAP
After nearly 25 years, the families of Bowraville's three murdered children paused to unveil a memorial built in their honour.
By
Danny Teece-Johnson

Source:
NITV News
8 Sep 2015 - 5:10 PM  UPDATED 9 Sep 2015 - 12:00 PM

TRANSCRIPT

Natalie Ahmat: Good Evening. After nearly 25 years, the families of Bowraville's three murdered children paused to unveil a Memorial built in their honour.

Dignitaries and supporters yesterday joined with the families who are still fighting for justice.

NITV's Danny Teece-Johnson was in Bowraville, on the New South Wales mid north coast.

A smoking ceremony for the Bowraville children 25 years since their deaths (NITV)

Danny Teece-Johnson: Uncle Martin Ballangarry smoked the crowd to begin the healing, as his sister Aunty Shirley welcomed everybody to country.

Aunty Shirley Ballangarry: We are here today to support the families of three children we have lost

Even though the families have heard this rhetoric a thousand times before, Dignatries again spoke of injustice, the families resilience and strength, and of a wicked man who still walks free. We all count the days, before the families might feel that same sense of freedom.

Deputy Police Commissioner, Jeff Loy: And when wicked people act, the police must act, and you know the families' tireless effort for justice have been nothing short of remarkable.

"We know what we want. That's justice for the loss of our kids. Please don't make us wait another half a life time and then hand our fight on to our next generation"

Leslie Williams, NSW Minister for Aboriginal Affairs: Three beautiful children that were taken from them by someone who, you know, clearly as they said was wicked. I think the word, I think maybe that's being a little too kind, but you know they have a long journey ahead of them and, you know, we want to be there to support them in terms of our role as Aboriginal affairs.

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After 25 years, you would hope the families of Bowraville's three murdered children would have more than a memorial to show for the quarter of a century struggle. The emotion as raw and real as it was 25 ago, the pain and the hurt hung in the air like a grey cloud as they told their stories.

Aunty Clarice Greenup, family member: I'd just like to thank everyone for coming, supporting us over the years, and a very big thank you to Gary Jubelin, 'cause he has been our guardian angel since he's come and supported us with our fight for our three kids.

Aunty Helen Duroux, family member: We know what we want. That's justice for the loss of our kids. Please don't make us wait another half a life time and then hand our fight on to our next generation.

On November 17 Justice Woods will hand down his recommendations to the NSW Parliament which will essentially help pave the way for justice, or create another road block in the communities journey to healing. But make no mistake, they will never give up - they are Gumbaynggirr mob after all.

Lucas Craig: It is very emotional because it is still really fresh in our minds, more so because we don't have justice just yet.

Lulu Jarret: It's just beautiful to see the support that we've got over the years and that so many people remember the children

"They want to be there in parliament on the day to really put the pressure on, and I think that there is a high expectation that it will deliver a finding that will allow them to take the cases back to court"

But today is a stepping stone to justice. With bipartisan support at the highest level the talk has been talked and now the families want to see those in power - walk the walk.

NSW Minister for Aboriginal Affairs Leslie Williams (NITV)

Larissa Behrendt, lawyer and UTS Academic: I think that the next step for the family as they've said is they want to be there in parliament on the day to really keep the pressure on, and I think that there is a high expectation that it will deliver a finding that will allow them to take their cases back in to court.

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Families of Bowraville murdered one step closer to justice
The families of three Aboriginal children murdered in Bowraville 24 years ago could finally see their killer brought to justice, after a parliamentary committee yesterday recommended laws be altered to allow for a retrial.

And in the spirit of the historic Freedom Ride, the families are organising the Bowraville Ride to get everyone to Sydney for Justice Woods findings.

Leonie Duroux, family member: It looks like we'll have maybe a memorial walk from Hyde Park, it won't be a protest, it will be a memorial walk from Hyde Park to Parliament House.

Today the memorial stands to acknowlege what was lost, but unless justice is achieved, it also serves as a reminder of the failings of the past.

Danny Teece-Johnson, Knock 'em down Bowra, for NITV News!