• Batchelor Institute graduates with a lecturer. (Supplied)Source: Supplied
More than 100 students from 28 communities have celebrated an academic milestone, having graduated with a host of Vocational Education and Training qualifications gained through the Batchelor Institute of Indigenous Tertiary Education in Alice Springs.
By
Yasmin Noone

11 Sep 2015 - 6:20 PM  UPDATED 11 Sep 2015 - 6:42 PM

More than 100 students from 30 communities around Australia celebrated their graduation from a range of Vocational Education and Training through the Batchelor Institute of Indigenous Tertiary Education in Alice Springs in early September.

Susan Walker was one of the graduates whose academic success was recognised on the day.

Having just completed the Diploma of Education Support in 2014, she has already moved onto further study with the Advanced Diploma of Education with the institute.

Ms Walker said she was now looking forward to an encouraging future, thanks to tertiary study.

"This qualification will give me advanced credits towards a full teaching degree," said Ms Walker.

"My goal is to become a fully qualified teacher and have a class of my own."

The institute saw Indigenous and non-Indigenous students complete tertiary courses in among others, business, Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care; Conservation and Land Management, media, education support, kitchen operations, children’s services.

Around 54 graduating students attended the ceremony, held on the Desert Peoples Centre Campus in Alice Springs, as many were located in geographically remote locations and were unable to present.

"My goal is to become a fully qualified teacher and have a class of my own."

The Batchelor Institute of Indigenous Tertiary Education is Australia's largest Indigenous tertiary institution providing training and education to Indigenous people for more than 30 years.

The graduation ceremony combined European traditions with the cultures of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island communities, graphically demonstrating the Institute’s ‘both-ways’ philosophy of education.

Graduating students wore traditional European academic dress and were encouraged to also sport traditional decorations and regalia or their culture. Dance also formed part of the overall ceremony.

Robert Somerville AM, CEO of the Batchelor Institute for Indigenous Tertiary Education, said he was proud of each graduating student.

"Our aim is to reach out further and become Australia’s dual sector provider of choice for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people," Mr Somerville said.

"I am very proud of Batchelor its staff and our students. We are unique and we make a difference.

"Most importantly, [your qualification] enables you to make a real difference to our people whether it be as a professional, a tradesperson, a leader or a role model.

"…Remember that your learning journey doesn’t end today, and that we are looking forward to supporting you with your next educational challenge."

"I am very proud of Batchelor its staff and our students. We are unique and we make a difference."

2015 Special Achievement Awards

Special Achievement Awards were presented to outstanding students in their field of study at the graduation ceremony.

  • The Central Australian Aboriginal Media Association (CAAMA) Award and Koori Mail Award was presented by Professor Rose to Christine Williams from Alice Springs in recognition of outstanding achievement by a student enrolled in Broadcasting or Media studies. Both awards encourage further study in the media field.
  • The NBC Consultants Award was presented by Centre for Appropriate Technology (CAT) Chair, Peter Renehan to Phillip Carter from Alice Springs in recognition of the most outstanding VET student that has completed a Certificate I, II or III in Business. Mr Carter has successfully completed Certificate III in Business.

Special guests at the event included Minister for Education Northern Territory Peter Chandler MLA; Batchelor Institute Chair of Council Professor Mark Rose and CEOs from a range of Central Australian businesses as well as Batchelor Council.

Lecturer in Family Wellbeing, Dawn Ross, was the Master of Ceremonies and gave a ‘Welcome to the Precinct’ address.

Kwertengerle for Antulye and a representative of Lhere Artepe Aboriginal Corporation, Peter Wallace, conducted the ‘Welcome to Country’.

The ceremony was broadcast live on the CAAMA radio network.