• From left: Adam Hansen, Adam Linforth, Cleveland McGhie and Tyler Smith. (Tara Callinan)Source: Tara Callinan
Nineteen-year-old Cleveland McGhie was among the students and surfers that stripped off on Sydney's Bondi Beach for Survival Day. He explains why to NITV's Tara Callinan.
By
Tara Callinan

Source:
NITV News
22 Jan 2016 - 2:18 PM  UPDATED 22 Jan 2016 - 5:32 PM

"Survival is everything to me. I don’t want to see our culture disappear ... hopefully one day our language will come back."

The young Wiradjuri man from Wollongong in the Illawarra region of New South Wales, is in Sydney promoting his favourite pair of smugglers to rock on Survival Day.

Photos: Stripping off for Survival
Budgy Smuggler and Australian Indigenous Mentoring Experience joins forces ahead of January 26.

"To see First Nations culture coming to life on these pants is incredible."

"Budgy Smuggler is an international brand so the impact will be huge. It might even help close the gap of inequality in Australia," said Mr McGhie.

He hopes the swimwear will start a national conversation about Australia’s Indigenous history in the lead up to January 26.

“You know, what’s the story behind them? What’s the meaning of the design?”

The pair of smugglers worn by McGhie were designed by a fellow AIME Mentee, who was inspired by the Aboriginal history linked to an inner-city suburb in Sydney.

According to Budgy Smuggler owner, Adam Linforth, the design represents the iconic region known as La Perouse.

“It shows the main land, Bare Island and the sea surrounding it.”

Mr Linforth says he will donate all proceeds made from the sale of each limited edition Smuggler to AIME, the Australian Indigenous Mentoring Experience, who hope to raise $10,000 dollars by the end of summer.

Photos: Stripping off for Survival
Budgy Smuggler and Australian Indigenous Mentoring Experience joins forces ahead of January 26.