• PM Malcolm Turnbull and Labor Opposition leader Bill Shorten (AAP)Source: AAP
The National Congress of Australia’s First People is using today's news that we are facing a July 2 election to campaign on Indigenous issues in the lead up to the federal poll.
By
Myles Morgan

19 Apr 2016 - 6:43 PM  UPDATED 19 Apr 2016 - 6:44 PM

In inner-Sydney Redfern, Rod Little is preparing his own election campaign.

The co-chair of the National Congress of Australia’s First People is going to spend the next three months putting Aboriginal affairs on politicians' radars.

“They've lost their way in terms of finding solutions for our people,” he said.

It still needs to be officially signed off but the Prime Minister said today Australians will be voting in an election on July 2 if the election is called after the may budget. The nation appears to be being set up for a three month election if this happens.

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Rod Little said that questions need to be answered before the election.

“There have been election promises broken in the past and we don't want to see that happen because of the crisis. We don't want our affairs diving any further. We want to be able to have a relationship with government and the parliament to correct it,” he said.

And whether it's Malcolm Turnbull or Bill Shorten who become Prime Minister – Little said the Congress’ demands are clear.

“No more cuts. No more cuts to front line services and no more decision making that takes away from those communities identified.”

In Canberra, Malcolm Turnbull already has his trigger for a double dissolution election.

Last night, the Senate failed for the second time to pass the controversial Australian Building and Construction Commission Bill.

The Governor-General just needs to sign off on the early election.

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“My intention is after the Budget, an appropriate time after the Budget has been delivered, I will be asking the Governor-General to dissolve both Houses of the parliament for an election which I expect to be held on 2 July,” Mr Turnbull said today.

That means three months of campaigning. So political parties are sharpening their election pitches.

“Labor is ready for the election because We know what we Stand for," said Opposition leader Bill Shorten. 

"Decent jobs, well-funded education, quality health care, protecting Medicare, renewable energy, encouraged to take up the burden of climate change, and a fair taxation system.” 

But where do Indigenous people lie in these promises of growth and jobs asked Mr Little.

“The expenditure and the decision making is out of the hands of first peoples,” he said.

“Those service providers, it's out of their hands and they're tied to contractual arrangements with governments. That makes it even more difficult for them to improve on their service delivery they're contracted to do.”

 

 

 

In inner-Sydney Redfern, Rod Little is preparing his own election campaign.

 

The co-chair of the national Congress of Australia’s First People is going to spend the next three months putting Aboriginal affairs on politicians' radars.

 

“They've lost their way in terms of finding solutions for our people,” he said.

 

It still needs to be officially signed off but the Prime Minister said today Australians will be voting in an election on July 2 if the election is called after the may budget. The nation appears to be being set up for a three month election if this happens.

 

Rod Little said that questions need to be answered before the election.

 

“There have been election promises broken in the past and we don't want to see that happen because of the crisis. We don't want our affairs diving any further. We want to be able to have a relationship with government and the parliament to correct it,” he said.

 

And whether it's Malcolm Turnbull or Bill Shorten who become Prime Minister – Little said the Congress’ demands are clear.

 

“No more cuts. No more cuts to frontline services and no more decision making that takes away from those communities identified.”

 

In Canberra, Malcolm Turnbull already has his trigger for a double dissolution election.

 

Last night, the Senate failed for the second time to pass the controversial Australian Building and Construction Commission Bill.

 

The Governor-General just needs to sign off on the early election - which appears to be a mere formality.

 

“My intention is after the Budget, an appropriate time after the Budget has been delivered, I will be asking the Governor-General to dissolve both Houses of the parliament for an election which I expect to be held on 2 July.,” Mr Turnbull said today.

 

That means three months of campaigning. So political parties are sharpening their election pitches.

 

“Labor is ready for the election because We know what we Stand for. Decent jobs, well-funded education, quality health care, protecting Medicare, renewable energy, encouraged to take up the burden of climate change, and a fair taxation system,” said Opposition leader Bill Shorten.

 

 

But where do Indigenous people lie in these promises of growth and jobs asked Mr Little.

 

“The expenditure and the decision making is out of the hands of first peoples,” he said.

“Those service providers, it's out of their hands and they're tied to contractual arrangements with governments. That makes it even more difficult for them to improve on their service delivery they're contracted to do.”