• Curtis Taylor looks on. (NITV)Source: NITV
Nine artists from the remote western desert community of Parnngurr in central WA will protest Cameco and Mitsubishi’s proposed Kintyre uranium project on Martu native title determined country.
By
NITV Staff Writer

Source:
The Point
30 May 2016 - 6:58 PM  UPDATED 31 May 2016 - 10:49 AM

The artists' artwork 'Kalyu' tells how the land and water interact beneath the surface, the main concern about the uranium proposal going ahead.

Artist Curtis Taylor told 'The Point' the country is “really important” and he wants to sustain it.

“A lot of the stories in the painting talks about that and what would happen if it disappeared or got affected in some way,” he says.

“People had that fear they wouldn’t travel across that country, they wouldn’t hunt even in that area, or even drink that water from that area,” he says.

Anohni, an artist from Britain who travelled to the region to meet Curtis Taylor and other artists in 2013, says she admires the way the art mirrors the landscape.

“It’s as good as it gets” she told ‘The Point’.

She says uranium is “detrimental to humanity and nature” and hopes the community’s protest is successful.

On June 5, some of the community will walk one hundred kilometres from Parnngurr Aboriginal Community to the Kintyre uranium.

The project threatens Karlamilyi National Park (formerly known as Rudall River) WAs biggest national park, in the East Pilbara WA.

The artists’ artwork Kalyu tells how the land and water interact beneath the surface, the main concern about the uranium proposal going ahead.

 

For more discussions on contemporary art, watch Colour Theory Season 3 on NITV at 9.00pm on Sunday from 12 June.