• (L-R) Miranda Tapsell, Nakkiah Lui and Samantha Harris in Marie Claire's April 2017 issue (Marie Claire/Supplied)Source: Marie Claire/Supplied
Marie Claire dedicates a page to Indigenous achievement in their International Women's Day feature, 'The Future is Female'.
By
Sophie Verass

2 Mar 2017 - 1:33 PM  UPDATED 2 Mar 2017 - 1:34 PM

Saluting the leaders of tomorrow, style publication Marie Claire’s most recent magazine issue profiles 21 high achieving women to celebrate International Women’s Day; a day which recognises the experiences of women and celebrates their past, present and emerging successes in the political, economic and social landscapes.

The 12-page spread titled, ‘The Future is Female’ features a diverse selection of Australian talent from athletes to actors , activists to entrepreneurs, including the players of the AFL Women’s League, writer and public speaker Yassmin-Abdel-Magied, trans advocate Georgie Stone and other individuals who work tirelessly to forge a better tomorrow.

A double-page spread has been dedicated to Indigenous talent, with Logie-Award winning Larrakia woman, Miranda Tapsell; comedian and writer Gamillaroi/Torres Strait Islander woman, Nakkiah Lui; and iconic model Samantha Harris who is a decedent of the Dunghutti people. All three stand as role models for young women as a whole, but also Indigenous Australians. 

“As Australians, one of our greatest strengths is that we can have a laugh.” Lui is quoted in Marie Claire. She talks about finding female collaborations working in a male-dominated industry, “I’m a big believer in the ‘Shine’ theory – women supporting other women.”

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Nicky Briger, Editor of Marie Claire told NITV, “Our Marie Claire reportage celebrates the young leaders of tomorrow. Miranda, Nakkiah and Samantha are incredible role models who have been working tirelessly to promote racial diversity on Australian screens, as well as helping Indigenous communities at a grassroots level.

Miranda, Nakkiah and Samantha are incredible role models who have been working tirelessly to promote racial diversity on Australian screens, as well as helping Indigenous communities at a grassroots level. 

“These women are fearless, intelligent and compassionate – and they’re paving the way for the next generation of women in Australia. In the lead up to International Women’s Day next week, it was a given for Marie Claire to include these wonderful game-changers in the current issue.”

Miranda Tapsell posted an Instagram this morning saying, “I danced to Whitney Houston's "I Wanna Dance With Somebody" with these beautiful queens (Lui and Harris) for [Marie Claire] this month! It is an absolute honour to be included in celebrating International Women's day in this issue.”

International Women's Day is on 8 March

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