• These 11 Indigenous artists are past and present offenders, who are finding culture through artistic rehabilitation. Darcy Murray - River Dreaming. (NITV News)Source: NITV News
This collection of Indigenous artwork was inspired by 10 artists, all of whom were/currently in jail aims to promote cultural strengthening and artistic expression in their transition back into the community.
By
Laura Morelli

6 Jun 2017 - 4:48 PM  UPDATED 7 Jun 2017 - 10:27 AM

The Deakin University Art Gallery has partnered with community arts organisation - The Torch, to showcase creative artworks by Indigenous artists in its latest pop-up exhibition: ‘No Turning Back: Artworks from The Torch’.

The 10 artists participated in The Torch’s Indigenous Arts in Prison and Community program, which supports current and former Indigenous offenders in Victoria. Their focus is on cultural strengthening and artistic expression in the rehabilitation process.

“This allows artists to build self-esteem and economic independence - both key factors which increase the chances of Indigenous offenders successfully transitioning from prison to community.” 

Chief Executive Officer at The Torch, and Barkindji man, Kent Morris, says it’s about providing people with a second chance.

“This allows artists to build self-esteem and economic independence - both key factors which have been shown to increase the chances of Indigenous offenders successfully transitioning from prison to the community,” Mr Morris said.

“100% of the purchase price goes direct to the artist, with the major part of the purchase price held in trust until the artist is released. Interest from the Trust account goes to a fund supporting victims of crime.”


The implementation of the Aboriginal Arts Policy Model in 2015 allowed Indigenous artists in custody, in Victoria to be involved in the program and sell their artworks through The Torch organisation.

Manager of the Deakin University Art Gallery, Leanne Willis, said the Deakin University Art Gallery was proud to support The Torch’s Indigenous Arts in Prison and Community program.

"The artworks provide a glimpse into the artists’ lives; their stories, culture, and hopes for the future.”

No Turning Back is a testament to the success of The Torch’s cultural and arts vocational support for Indigenous offenders and ex-offenders,” Ms Willis said.

“The exhibition provides participants with an opportunity to share their stories and connect to the community. Each of the stunning artworks provides a glimpse into the artists’ lives; their stories, culture, and hopes for the future.”


 No Turning Back: Artworks from The Torch will be open until Friday 14 July at Deakin’s Downtown site.

RECOMMENDED ARTICLES:
Aspiring doctor and third-generation Aboriginal dot artist selected as Miss NAIDOC Perth finalist
Beige Dimer is an aspiring doctor and third-generation Aboriginal dot artist. The Wongatha/Ngadju Mirning woman has been selected as one of the eight finalists in the Miss NAIDOC Perth program
First Nations National Convention in Uluru kicks off with a heartfelt, meaningful ceremony
The Constitutional recognition forum has kicked off at Uluru with 250 Aboriginal delegates coming together to discuss the best way forward.
East Pilbara Indigenous art parades the Fashion Week runway
Forget florals, stripes and even paisley - an emerging fashion label at Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Australia uses Indigenous artwork for its new collection.
APRA gives aspiring muso's a solid Starting Ground
This week in Byron Bay aspiring Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander musicians had the chance to develop their music, business and marketing skills from some of our most talented and inspirational artists, managers and producers.