• (L-R) Warndu, Boodjera & Alperstein Designs (Facebook )
Give back to Mob this giving season and purchase some gifts from Australia's myraid of Indigenous manufactors, small businesses and designers.
By
Emily Nicol

19 Dec 2017 - 4:03 PM  UPDATED 19 Dec 2017 - 4:03 PM

CLOTHING & ACCESSORIES

 

Magpie Goose 

Featuring eye catching, bold designs created and hand-printed in remote Aboriginal communities, the Magpie Goose fashion label is a social enterprise founded by two Katherine locals Maggie McGowan and Laura Egan. Named after a bird native to the area, their intention is to showcase and celebrate original artwork and design in contemporary fashion using natural fibres.

Their first range features textiles from four art centres in remote communities: Palngun Wurangat (Wadeye), Injalak Arts (Gunbalanya), Tiwi Designs (Wurrumiyanga) and Babbarra Women’s Centre (Maningrida) and the plan is to continue to develop strong ties with other communities, to help artists and residents share culture and dreaming in a unique way. The label will also help develop training and employment opportunities into artists and textile makers.

 

Faebella

A luxury activewear brand Faebella features designs by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artists. The brand's mission is, To inspire you to live an active lifestyle in sync with the land. To live life with vibrancy. To become living art.

Founded by Gurang Gurang/Wuthathi woman Alisha Geary, the first time business owner already has her work cut out for her. Faebella made international headlines after being crowned this year's winner of the inaugural Pitch@Palace Australia, a start-up business competition which was founded by The Duke of York, HRH Prince Andrew.

Culture has always played a large part in Geary's life, and after undertaking a business degree and seeing a gap in the market, it was clear that there was a way that she could combine both of her strengths. Speaking to NITV recently, Geary expressed concern at the misrepresentation of Aboriginal culture, “There are so many people around the world who don’t know what our culture is or who Aboriginals are. There’s very little knowledge out there about us, and I think that’s a shame for the oldest surviving culture in the world.”

 

Occulture

Occulture is a collaboration of artisans transferring ancient stories into modern, bold and striking statement jewellery. The brand aims to 'celebrate and strengthen the songline of culture, knowledge, artists and community.'
 
Collaborating with artists across a range of communities including the Warlukurlangu people of the Yuendumu region, Gamilaraay woma, Arkeria Rose Armstrong, well-known and respected artists from Utopia and Yuelumu country, including Raymond Walters Japanangka.
 
Each piece is made by hand and is bespoke, with variations in size, shape and finish and melds traditional artwork with cutting edge technology.
 
Created by designer Lisa Engeman, the brand is a member of the Indigenous Art Code who promotes and regulates the fair and ethical trade in works of art by Indigenous artists. All of the artwork featured in the Occulture jewellery range is licensed with the royalties paid directly to each artist.
 

 

BEAUTY & COSMETICS

 

Boodjera

The marriage of two already existing businesses, Mother Earth Aromatherapy & IN-Balance Australia, Boodjera meaning 'Earth, Land and Country' is a socially focused natural skincare company dedicated to creating positive outcomes and opportunity for Aboriginal communities. Based in WA, Boodjera offers a range of earthy skincare, for both women and men men specialises in traditional native bush medicine with modern day aromatherapy.

The company is also committed to giving back and employment pathways, teaming up with All Seasons Models to showcase and promote, Aboriginal Models and 25 per cent of each product sale goes straight to Aboriginal artists who design their labels, through AIME’s ‘Art & Education Programs’ initative. 

 

Dilkara Essence of Australia

Created by Kamilaroi businesswoman, entrepreneur and former hairdresser Julie Okely, the Dilkara (meaning 'Rainbow') hair care products brand was developed to showcase and celebrate the best native ingredients and to support Indigenous communities.

The hair care range which includes shampoos, conditioners to leave-in treatments and serums contains rich native  ingredients such as Kakadu Plum extract, Lilly Pilly Berry, Quandong and Native Peppermint Oil. The products are also free from parabens and harsh chemicals.  

Okely has over 25 years in the hair and beauty industry and is now passionate about combining her knowledge with her passion for her culture by offering the first range of hair care in Australia to exclusively use native ingredients.

 

Indigiearth

The award-winning Aboriginal owned and operated business aims to showcase Australian native products at their best. This includes their range of delicious sauces, chutneys and teas to skin care and soy candles.

Featuring a boutique range of handmade, pure and natural products, Indigiearth's skin care range is produced with wild crafted ingredients such as kakadu plum, emu oil, lemon myrtle, wild berry and other native flowers, fruits and loils. From body scrubs to eye creams, hand creams and a rich botantical body custard, Indigiearth's skin care range has broad appeal, backed up by an important Australian story.  

Founded by Sharon Winsor, a Ngemba Weilwan woman of Western NSW, Indigiearth came from her passion for the natural abundance of mother earth and the bush foods she ate when she was a child. 

FOOD

 

Warndu

A creative and visionary couple who are bringing a native twist to some of our nation's most loved dishes.

Warndu prides themselves on being a part of the food movement which revives and celebrates the use of native ingredients. The culinary business is a collaboration between self-taught cook and food writer Rebecca Sullivan who has worked with some of the worlds' biggest names in food, and Adnyamathanha man Damien Coulthard, whose combined experience in the world of food, culture and community gives their brand a unique and considered edge.

Their online shop sells items on the gourmet food trend with a uniquely traditional twist such as their Roo Broth and saltbush infused olive oil. Already well known through their stall at Adelaide food markets, their range which also includes teas, spices and vinegars has been receiving great reviews. 

 

Chocolate On Purpose

Combining fine chocolate with the best of Australian Native fruits and nuts which are sourced from Aboriginal Communities around Australia and local producers from Central West NSW. 

Featuring three different ranges Bush Food Chocolate® Choc Full Of Local® and Brekkie Chocolate, Chocolate on Purpose invite you to discover the power of Australian superfoods with ingredients such as white chocolate with wattleseed, Illawarra Plum, Quandong and Riberry. 

 

Max's Black

Family run business, Max’s Black makes a deadly range of sauces and pastes made from a blend of fruits, spices, nuts and Australian bush herbs.

Offering a distinctive and unique collection to dining tables and pantry cupboards, Max's Black was created around their family favourite "black sauce". Created by Maxine or 'Max', her love of good food produced this spicy black sauce for family and friends. However with great pride and honour, her daughter Tahn, a Wardandi woman, and her partner Robert, a Nunda man and a chef and businessman, have taken Max's recipe to share the unique sauce with the rest of the world. 

Max's Black products are made by bringing family together and on manufacturing days, both Tahn and Robert's family get together to cook, yarn and laugh while making this unique Australian product. 

 

 

EXPERIENCE

 

Lirrwi Yolgnu experience

A range of unique experiences are offered on Yolgnu homelands by Lirrwi Tours. With experiences ranging from multi-day, women only and photography tours, the company aims to ensure that however you connect you will be made to feel a part of the family. Each immersion includes a traditional welcome to country or smoking ceremony, learning about Yolgnu kinship, lore and language and local foods, plants medicines as well as dance and storytelling. 

 

Ngaran Ngaran

Established in 2011, Ngaran Ngaran Culture Awareness -NNCA is a First Nations owned and operated cultural service provider on the far south coast of NSW on Yuin country. The company aims to 'facilitate cultural awakenings in the Tourism, Corporate, Event and Education sectors with a range of services to help ensure that traditional koori cultural ways of knowing get delivered in South Eastern Australia.' 

Founded by Dwayne Bannon-Harrison, also known by his traditional name 'Naja' given to him by his grandfather and Yuin elder Uncle Max 'Dulumunmun' Harrison, Dwayne endeavours to carry on the knowledge and cultural teachings from his elders for himself, his family and wider community and continue to share traditional culture in Yuin country.

 

Kuku Yalanji Cultural Habitat Tours

Join brothers Linc and Brandon Walker on their homeground the beautiful Cooya Beach (Kuyu Kuyu) for an immersion into culture on their mudflat, mangrove and beach tour.

The Kubirri Warra brothers will show you how they continue to care for country, how to read the tides and weather patterns by observing the changing scenery and wildlife, how to throw a spear and introduce you to the native plants used for food and medicine. They also offer traditional fishing tours where you can catch your own mudcrab or go spearfishing and cook and enjoy your own catch with their family.

 

ART & CULTURE

Maruku 

Maruku Arts meaning “belonging to black”,  is a thriving arts and culture centre situated at the Uluru-Kata Tjuta Cultural Centre. Owned and operated by Anangu people for over 30 years, the centre has been offering art experiences and now workshops to the community and visitors.

The centre's aim is to 'keep culture strong and alive, for future generations of artists and make culture accessible in an authentic way to those that seek a more in-depth understanding'. They also aim to provide an important form of income to artists living in remote communities across Anangu lands. Local artists host workshops where visitors can learn about traditional art and create their own masterpiece to take home, alternatively they have an online shop.

 

Bunjilaka Melbourne Museum

Bunjilaka at Melbourne Museum is a leading Aboriginal Cultural Centre which includes one of the most significant Aboriginal cultures collection in the world. The centre has regular exhibitions that celebrate connection to country and land whilst also exploring the impact of British colonisation, the struggles and achievements for Aboriginal people who have strived to maintain their culture, and looks at the ever changing conversation about Aboriginal knowledge, property and law within Australia. GIft tickets for family and friends here.

 

Warlu Arts

Meaning “belonging to fire” in Warlpiri, Warlukurlangu is an artist collective and one of the longest running  Aboriginal-owned art centres in Central Australia.

Located in Yuendumu, 300km northwest of Alice Springs in the Northern Territory, the art centre holds a foundation of traditional Warlpiri culture and continues to be an essential part of Yuendumu’s community. Owned and governed by over 600 members, Warlukurlangu art centre is well known for their colourful acrylic paintings and fine limited-edition prints, but they also collaborate with manufacturers and their online store features homewares and even dog accessories. Royalties from the collectives extensive range of greeting cards go directly back to the artist and community. 

 

Searching for a last minute gift? Supply Nation has the largest Indigenous Business Directory. From clothing to cookware, try #BuyIndigenous this Christmas.

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