• First Nation's Political Party (FNPP) founder Maurie Japarta Ryan and supporters group in front of Old Parliament House in Canberra. (AAP)
Australia's first Aboriginal political party says it's past time Indigenous voices were heard in Parliament.
Source:
NITV News
2 Sep 2013 - 6:06 PM  UPDATED 2 Sep 2013 - 9:39 PM

Australia's first Aboriginal political party says it's past time Indigenous voices were heard in Parliament.

First Nations founder Maurie Ryan outlined the party's vision for the future at the campaign launch in Darwin.

When the First Nations party officially launched its  20-13 election campaign, founding member, Maurie Japarta Ryan, got straight to the point.

"There has been no representation of Aboriginal  voices, tribal voices of aboriginal people in federal parliament," he said.

"It has taken a long time for this voice to be heard and to the people of the Northern Territory and australia, this is a wake up call that voices of this political party will be heard."

The Northern Territory-based political party has four candidates in the upcoming election. First Nations has been campaigning on Indigenous rights and constitutional reform.

Senate hopeful Rosalie Kunoth Monks her party has always opposed the Intervention which was backed by both major parties.

"To make legislations, which concerns the first nations people - we've been slammed by the intervention for the last six to seven years and the continuation of the Stronger Futures (policy), which is a policy which was made in our absence we are human beings."

With the power of the Aboriginal and bush vote crucial in deciding last year's NT election, Maurie Ryan says it's once again time to change the political landscape.

"I hope the rest of Australia is like somebody throwing a rock into a river, where the ripple effects happen where you come on board and stand up. Instead of two political parties that say 'we will speak for you' but they dont'