The Goombuckar Cultural Bus is educating the Indigenous leaders of tomorrow, delivering education and a celebration of tradition Aboriginal culture straight to primary aged children living in Nambour, Queensland.
By
Jodan Perry

Source:
NITV News
23 Sep 2015 - 10:46 AM  UPDATED 23 Sep 2015 - 12:11 PM
TRANSCRIPT

Natalie Ahmat: The 'Goombuckar Cultural Bus' is raising Aboriginal cultural awareness by educating the leaders of tomorrow.

The bus goes out to schools and delivers lessons to primary aged children, with their curriculum based on a celebration of traditional Aboriginal culture.

Queensland Correspondent Jodan Perry went for a ride.

Jodan Perry: In the town of Nambour, just north of Brisbane, is a small business with big hopes for the future. 'Goombuckar Creations' is the brainchild of proud Gubbi Gubbi man Kerry Neill, and the company's foundations are built upon a celebration of Aboriginality.

Kerry Neill, Goombuckar Creations: It's about showcasing Aboriginal culture for what it really is: something cool, and something that's relevant and, to be honest, something that is sustainable for all of us.

Jodan Perry: Education is central to Goombuckar's goals, and a tool they use is the 'Indigenous cultural bus': A 34-seater converted into a mobile learning platform. The lessons delivered by the bus cater to school children, but the impression given is that anyone is welcome to come and get involved in the experience.

"It's about showcasing Aboriginal culture for what it really is: something cool, and something that's relevant and, to be honest, something that is sustainable for all of us."

Kerry Neill: When you walk inside i tell you what, real culture comes alive. Because there's stuff you can touch, there's stuff that you can feel there's green things there's plants, there's videos, there's projectors, there's toys there's didgeridoos, there's artefact,s there's stuff that's really scary. It's really really fun and the kids, to be honest, they come on board and they generally love the experience.

Jodan Perry: Creating the cultural bus is something very close to Kerry's heart, and imparting our knowledge to younger generations is critical in maintaining Aboriginal identity.

"We have an opportunity today to do just about anything we want, so if you're out there if you're young if you're old, if you're an entrepreneur, get out there and do it."

Kerry Neill: I get to be myself. I don't have to pretend. I don't have to you know come out and put on this big massive, olden day, caveman style Aboriginal performance.

I can just be me, and you know what? I can show my family's culture and my family's history in today's perspective and to be honest when those kids or those teachers of those GP's or those community service workers leave and they've got a smile on their face, I tell you what I know I've changed someone's opinion.

Jodan Perry: Kerry hopes his vision will grow in the future, and he has also created the site 'tribal link'- which aims to guide people or organisations seeking to learn about local Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander culture, engage with Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander custodians or community leaders.

He also has a mesasge for those out there who have their own aspirations.

Kerry Neill: We have an opportunity today to do just about anything we want, so if you're out there if you're young if you're old, if you're an entrepreneur, get out there and do it.

Jodan Perry for NITV NEWS