• Young filmmaker and Nulla Nulla creator: Dylan River (Supplied)Source: Supplied
'Dylan River, a Kaytetye man from Alice Springs, is a remarkable young filmmaker and the one to watch,' according to Flickerfest Director, Bronwyn Kidd.
By
Tara Callinan

Source:
NITV News
21 Jan 2016 - 5:52 PM  UPDATED 27 Jan 2016 - 12:52 PM

Bronwyn Kidd has sat at the helm of Flickerfes for 19 years and over that time has witnessed the birth of some of Australia’s greatest Indigenous filmmakers.

She says Dylan River is just as remarkable as a young Wayne Blair, the highly acclaimed director of 'Redfern Now' and 'The Sapphires'.

The ones to watch: Indigenous shorts at Flickerfest 2016
Indigenous films touring the country as part of Flickerfest’s ‘Best of Australia Series’ 2016.

“I don’t know how to react to that ... Wayne Blair is one of the best in my field and I look up to him, as well as my mum and dad,” said Mr River.

Twenty-three year old Dylan River is the son of Warwick Thornton and Alice Springs based producer Penelope McDonald.

His latest film ‘Nulla Nulla’ is currently touring the country as part of the Flickerfest Film Festival, which will launch in the NSW coastal town of Byron Bay on Friday night.

"Nulla Nulla actually features Wayne, who plays a cop that is thrown into the deep end,” said Mr River.

“Most of my films are about change and I hope audiences learn something ... or become more intrigued to learn about Aboriginal culture.”

'Nulla Nulla', a six-minute comedy, tells the story of a young policeman's first experience on a remote Aboriginal community.

“This year we actually have five Indigenous films. That’s the most ever,” said Ms Kidd.

“The record amount of Aboriginal involvement goes to show you that Australia’s attitude towards Aboriginal story telling is changing,” said Mr River.

Ms Kidd hopes her festival will provide a unique platform for emerging artists to showcase and celebrate their culture.

“We are not just about the ‘white, male Australia’ that we see on mainstream TV.”

“People really look forward to seeing our Aboriginal stories. It gives people an insight and a fresh look at Indigenous culture,” said Ms Kidd.

The Festival will remain on Bundjalung country in Byron Bay until January 24.

A total of 53 towns will be visited as part of the 2016 national tour.

A full list of key dates and locations can be found at http://flickerfest.com.au/.

The ones to watch: Indigenous shorts at Flickerfest 2016
Indigenous films touring the country as part of Flickerfest’s ‘Best of Australia Series’ 2016.