• "I am a proudly multicultural woman and embrace my Aboriginality": Tammy Solonec. (Facebook)Source: Facebook
CANDIDATE PROFILE | For human rights lawyer Tammy Solonec, a Labor Government is the only way to go for Australia.
By
Tammy Solonec

Source:
NITV News
6 Jun 2016 - 11:14 AM  UPDATED 6 Jun 2016 - 11:19 AM

Electorate: Swan (Western Australia)

Political affiliation: Australian Labor Party

1. Why are you running?

I am a proudly multicultural woman and embrace my Aboriginality in particular as a Nigena woman from Derby.

I grew up in a working class family in regional and remote WA. I raised my two children while maintaining a demanding legal career, 10 years of it as a sole parent, so I know the value of hard work and how important a Labor Government is for our community.

As a human rights lawyer, I've gained extensive experience fronting international and national peak bodies to campaign and fight for social equity, this experience will make me a fierce candidate for the people of Swan to have their issues heard in Canberra.

Swan, like all of WA, has been hit hard by the end of the mining boom. The last thing Swan families need is cuts to pensions, education and the selling off of Medicare.  

A vote for Labor is a vote for jobs, health and education - that's why I decided to run for Labor in Swan.

Live blog: D-day for Indigenous election candidates
NITV's bringing you full coverage of the election throughout the day.

2. What do you want to achieve?

As a lawyer and human rights defender, I've seen how policies of inclusion and social harmony positively shape our society. I know that Labor's 'Practical Policies That Put People First' will put into action policies to create an inclusive Australia that promotes multiculturalism, human rights and help for people doing it tough.

Labor also has more than 100 positive policies, with more to be announced through the next six weeks of campaigning, which will seek to improve the lives of people in the Swan.

Labor is a party of principal, it has and always will stand for quality education, jobs and better health.

The people of Swan are doing it tough, I want to achieve better job security for them, greater access to education and training opportunities, and access to health services.

I will not stand by and watch money cut from schools, hospitals and training services.

3. Is your Aboriginality important in deciding what policies you want to pursue?

My Aboriginal heritage is incredibly important to me, it has shaped me into the person I am today.

However, I'm equally proud of my Spanish, German and Ukrainian ancestry and being multicultural.

I believe having more Aboriginal politicians in Federal Parliament is a positive step for a more inclusive Australia

4. Treaty, Sovereignty or Recognition?

I believe Australia needs constitutional reform, to remove racism and provide protections against it.

Labor supports this. Australia’s Constitution needs to change to reflect the history, language and culture of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, and our nation’s fundamental belief in the importance of equality and non-discrimination.

Labor wants meaningful and substantive change, change that unites the nation and reflects the hopes and aspirations of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

However, this must be done in proper consultation with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

5. It’s July 3, the day after the election, and you have been elected, what is the first thing that you want to get a move on?

First on the agenda will be to protect Medicare, we must ensure access to health for everyone no matter what the size of their pay packet.

Bill Shorten has already announced he will move legislation within the first 100 days of a Labor Government to protect Medicare from privatisation. This will not only mean affordable health care for everyone, but it will save thousands of jobs.

RELATED STORY:
Five seats where your vote will count
Just over half of Australia’s First Peoples are enrolled to vote. A new campaign is out to increase that figure, and proves that the Indigenous vote does count.