• Labor is disrupting federal parliament to get race-hate speech laws off the agenda. (AAP)Source: AAP
Labor is disrupting parliament over proposed changes to race-hate speech laws, lashing the federal government for failing to consider the views of Indigenous Australians.
By
Belinda Merhab

Source:
AAP
28 Mar 2017 - 2:55 PM  UPDATED 28 Mar 2017 - 4:53 PM

Labor is slamming the federal government for failing to consider the views of Indigenous Australians over proposed changes to race-hate speech laws, moving to suspend standing orders in the Senate.

Leader of the opposition in the Senate Penny Wong has moved to suspend standing orders in a bid to push debate on the legislation to Thursday, as the government hadn't provided the opposition with amendments on the legislation before debate began on Tuesday.

Senator Wong critisised the government for refusing Indigenous Australians an opportunity to give evidence to an inquiry into the legislation.

"It really does say everything you need to know about this government... when it denies Indigenous Australians the right to be heard," she told parliament.

She also accused the government of trying to push the legislation through so it could lose quickly and get it off the agenda, given it does not have the numbers to pass the changes.

In response, Attorney-General George Brandis has told the Senate a joint parliamentary committee held nine full days of public hearings last year before a report was tabled in November.

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