• The new premier says he will wait for a report into the current treaty process before continuing the negoations (AAP)Source: AAP
Before taking office, SA Premier Steven Marshall labelled the treaty negation a “cruel hoax”.
By
Rangi Hirini

Source:
NITV News
1 May 2018 - 11:37 AM  UPDATED 1 May 2018 - 11:51 AM

South Australia’s new premier Steven Marshall has already hit “pause” on treaty negations just six weeks after being voted into power.

Speaking to the ABC, Mr Marshall said his government will wait for treaty commission Roger Thomas’ report into the current state of negations before continuing with the almost 18-month process.

“We're going to press the pause button and we're going to ask the Commissioner for Treaties, Roger Thomas, to prepare a report for the new government on lessons learned to date," Mr Marshall said.

"We've received plenty of anecdotal information that, in some instances, they've been more divisive than helpful, and we've made it clear that we have other priorities in this portfolio other than proceeding with treaty before a review."

Steven Marshall also holds the portfolio for Aboriginal Affairs and said that he will wait for the final outcomes of the report by Dr Thomas before deciding if he will walk away from treaty negations.

Treaty negations between Aboriginal people and the government have been in progression since December 2016.

In February, the former Labour Government signed a $1.8 million agreement with the Narungga people.

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Narungga man, Tauto Sansbury, who was a part of the signing and discussions for the agreement, had told NITV News just after the state election that he was concerned that treaty talks in South Australia would cease to exist.

“I don’t think any Liberal government wants to talk about or negotiate a treaty in any state or territory,” Mr Sansbury said at the time.

“One of the things about a treaty is that it acknowledges the mistreatment of Aboriginal people and recognises us a sovereign nation,” he said.

Both Victoria and the Northern Territory governments have previously stated their support for the treaty talks in their states.

The New South Wales Labor party also announced their support for treaty, if they are to win the 2019 state election.

With AAP

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