• Four protesters have faced court over their involvement in the Stolen Wealth protests from last month's Commonwealth Games. (Getty Images )Source: Getty Images
The four men say they will fight the charges following an appearance at a Gold Coast Magistrates Court.
By
Rangi Hirini

Source:
NITV News
2 May 2018 - 11:25 AM  UPDATED 2 May 2018 - 11:25 AM

Like the Commonwealth Games, the Stolenwealth rallies may have come to an end, but for some Indigenous protesters, the fight continues.

Four male protesters faced the Gold Coast Magistrates Court on Tuesday over a protest at Broadbeach Mall which took place on April 13.

Wayne ‘CoCo’ Wharton, Lawrence Miles, Sean Sandow and Kane Rainsford were all charged over the incident, including contravening a direction and obstructing police. The four men say they will fight the charges following an appearance at a Gold Coast Magistrates Court.

As he left court, Mr Wharton said he had no regrets over the protest.

“We’re fighting the charge, that’s all we’re saying,” he said.

Dylan Voller was also arrested over the same incident, and charged with breaching his bail.

Mr Voller didn’t appear at the Magistrates Court.

Mr Wharton and Mr Rainsford are charged with one count each of contravening a direction or requirement of police officer and assault or obstruct police.

Miles is charged with two counts of contravening a direction or requirement of police and one count of assault or obstruct police.

Sean Sandow is charged with one count each of contravening a direction or requirement of police officer and assault or obstruct police in relation to the protest.”

Over two weeks of the Commonwealth Games, Indigenous protesters delayed the Queen’s Baton Relay, hijacked Sunrise’s live broadcast, and tried several times to get into the Games official events.

All four protesters are set to return to the Magistrate’s Court next week as they fight to get more lenient bail conditions. 

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