• Most new immigrants to this country, regardless of when they arrived here don’t neatly fit into the “Gen” labels. (Getty Images)
Most new immigrants to this country, regardless of when they arrived here don’t neatly fit into the “Gen” labels.
By
Saman Shad

12 Nov 2019 - 2:47 PM  UPDATED 12 Nov 2019 - 2:55 PM

At a time when there are lots of things going on in our world to be angry and depressed about there’s one thing that you would’ve thought would rate pretty low on the list and that’s the rise of the “OK Boomer” meme. It seems to be making a lot of people very angry.

A Greens MP even used the phrase in New Zealand’s parliament and received heckles in return. Many are blaming Gen Z and those pesky kids on Tiktok for creating such intergenerational angst. But before we get all heated up about this intergenerational warfare it may help to remember that the Boomer, Millennial and Gen Z labels only really apply to those who are able to take advantage of intergenerational wealth, because isn’t that what it all comes down to?  

Most new immigrants to this country, regardless of when they arrived here don’t neatly fit into the “Gen” label.

Most new immigrants to this country, regardless of when they arrived here don’t neatly fit into the “Gen” labels. It means that many of these so-called Boomers are still paying off that mortgage. It takes a while to get a foothold in this country before getting your affairs sorted to even think of buying property. Gen X and Gen Y from migrant backgrounds may not have the luxury of getting unpaid internships, or living in inner-city apartments eating avo on toast, because for the most part they are probably still living at home. In fact many children from migrant backgrounds remain at home till they are married.

The struggles faced by the immigrants of this country aren’t restricted by their date of birth.

The struggles faced by the immigrants of this country aren’t restricted by their date of birth, rather they are dictated by the circumstances in which they or their parents arrived in this country. This doesn’t mean of course that many don’t succeed despite the odds. Many do, and their success benefits their children – this could be someone born as Gen Y passing the benefits down to their children or otherwise.

Meanwhile let’s enjoy OK Boomer for what it is – a bunch of kids hating on old folk.

It should be nothing new to a generation who were the instigators of “counter culture”, James Dean and Elvis Presley.

Saman Shad is the acting Voices editor. Follow her on Twitter @muminprogress 

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